Archive for the ‘ya fiction’ Tag

Interview with Joshua Jacobs   1 comment

josh0Today’s interview is with Joshua Jacobs, author of The Withering, a fantastic YA dystopian. Joshua was one of my favorite authors on the Authonomy writers website, so I’ve been watching for him to publish for some time. Welcome to the blog, Josh. Tell us something about yourself. 

By day, I teach History and English to a bunch of crazy, loveable 8th graders who probably do more to educate me than I do them. By night, I enjoy nothing more than a relaxing night with my fiancée drinking a beer, watching a movie, or having a shopping cart race. I spend my days with a deliberate but sometimes spontaneous balance between work and play.

At what point did you know you wanted to be a writer?

I’ve always had an overactive imagination, so as soon as I could string a few words together I was writing stories. I still remember elementary school when I wrote a story about my best friends going trick-or-treating on Halloween. I think half of us died in the end, which might explain why some of my stories nowadays are so dark.

What’s Halloween without a few scares? Where do you get the inspiration for your novels?

Anywhere I can! I’ve found that the older I get, the harder it is to develop a good idea for a story. As for tone, theme, and writing style, I would say whichever author I’m reading at the moment is the author who inspires me the most. I tend to write similarly to whatever it is I’m reading. As a result, I try to stick to one author while I’m in the process of writing a novel.

What are you passionate about?

My job, my family, and every Arizona sports team. And hot wings. My week isn’t complete until I’ve had my first dozen.

What is your favorite genre … to read … to write?

I like to read many different genres, but mostly, I limit myself to whatever genre I’m writing in at the moment. I spend a lot of time reading young adult, fantasy, horror, and science fiction with a sprinkling of realistic fiction to keep me grounded.

What point of view do you prefer to write, and why?

I love writing in first person. It comes much more naturally for me, and I find it easier to tap into a character’s mind/personality. The Withering, however, is in third person, which is one of the main reasons it took me so long to write!

I really liked The Withering in its beta version on Authonomy. What sort of research do you do for your novels?

As little as possible. I love learning, especially about history, but not when I have to learn and not when it means I have to stop the writing process to conduct research. One of my friends once suggested I write historical fiction, since I teach History. I considered it for about thirty seconds before quickly reminding him that he was out of his mind.

When you are not writing, what do you do?

I spend a lot of my time working out/running. I coach Cross Country and Track and Field at my school. I also enjoy reading, watching movies, playing games, going to new places, and trying new things. I’m never one to be bored.

TWoA2What is something you cannot live without?

Exercise! It’s my therapist, my life coach, my diet. It keeps me healthy and sane. Without it, I wouldn’t be where I am today.

Do you write from an outline or are you a discovery writer? Why?

I’ve done both, but in recent years, I’ve become an outliner. I’ve found the finished work is always more coherent and better developed. I’ve also learned that the story really develops and takes shape apart from the outline as I progress, which gives me structure but also allows me some freedom with the plot and characters.  I remember my first novel was written without an outline and it ended up being close to 400 pages and had so many subplots that didn’t link together that by the end I’m pretty sure I left about half of them unresolved. It might work for some people, but I wouldn’t recommend it.

The Broken OnesI’m going to drop you in a remote Alaska cabin for a month. It’s summer so you don’t have worry about freezing to death. I’ll supply the food and the mosquito spray. What do you do while you’re there and what do you bring with you? If you’re bringing books, what are they?

Sounds like a perfect opportunity to write a novel. Probably a horror novel, given the setting. I’d bring plenty of Stephen King books for inspiration. Oh, and I’d do lots and lots of exploring!

Talk about your books individually.

The Withering, my only published novel, follows Alice Issaacs who lives in a world destroyed by a plague called the Withering. The disease begins with a horrible black mark that quickly spreads, consuming the body within days. Alice has had the mark for two years now and it hasn’t spread. Now she’s on the run from a group that believes she is responsible for starting the disease. It’s available for purchase as an ebook through Amazon’s publishing imprint, Kindle Press.

My other two novels I hope to one day publish are The Words of Adriel and The Broken Ones. The Words of Adriel is about Blake Matthews, trouble-maker extraordinaire, who discovers a book that grants wishes. Through a series of unfortunate events, he learns that the book is possessed by a demon, and that this isn’t the first time someone in his family has used the book for personal gain. He works to uncover the mystery behind the book, but with every wish, the demon grows stronger.

Finally, The Broken Ones takes place in the future. People have evolved beyond emotions. Society is controlled by Rationals, people without emotions who only do things for logical reasons, and the world works like a well-oiled machine. If one is born an Emotional, he/she is quickly eliminated by the System to guarantee society continues to function in its most efficient way. Penny and her family are Emotionals who have eluded the System for years and live amongst the Rationals, until one day her secret gets out.

Joshua JacobsWas it your intention to write a story with a message or a moral?

Not really. My only real goal when I begin a story is to entertain the reader. If I can get you to keep turning pages, that’s all that really matters to me. However, I do find that every novel I’ve ever written ends up having multiple messages/themes that pertain to everyday life. This probably happens because I try to make my characters and their experiences realistic, and real life is packed full of lessons just waiting to be learned.

What do you want readers to think or feel after reading one of your books?

You just hit the key to writing a successful novel with that question. It doesn’t matter what readers think or feel throughout a novel. What matters is that they think or feel anything at all. I teach my students that writing is about manipulating the reader. It sounds horrible, I know, but it’s true. If you can get your reader to feel any sort of emotion (anger, sadness, joy, etc), then you’ve done your job. What do I want my readers to think and feel after reading one of my books? Anything! Anything at all! If they aren’t thinking or feeling, I haven’t done my job.

Where can we find your books and other writings?

Links

http://www.amazon.com/Withering-Joshua-Jacobs-ebook/dp/B00UVXZC1S/ref=la_B00YDOZQLC_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435727728&sr=1-1

Website: http://jmjacobs.com/

Authonomy: https://www.authonomy.com/user/45e8ba6c-6e65-40b6-87e7-4b34b1009211/

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Interview with CL Wells   7 comments

Today’s interview is with debut novelist, CL Wells. Welcome to the blog.

Thanks so much for having me, Lela!

Tell us something about yourself.

Well, I was born in raised in Kansas, but I don’t plan on spending the rest of my life here. As soon as I can, I will try to move far, far, far away from winter.

For the last ten years I’ve worked in Finance at a major corporation. While I’m grateful for my job… because it does pay the bills… and for food, which is important, and publishing, which is really important, I always say real life starts once I’m walking out the door at the end of the workday.

We only have four legged children and they’re both older than us in their respective fur-years. We have a senior doggie that is around 13 or 14 and our cat is 17. I’ll stop there otherwise I will talk about them forever.

We have two dogs (one who is quite geriatric) and we’ve had lots of cats (just not now). At what point did you know you wanted to be a writer?

My first real memory of enjoying the writing process was in grade school. We’d been learning about the science of the weather and our assignment was to write a weather report. Our teacher said we could pick any location. So, I chose Mars and my meteorologist was abducted by aliens midway through his report. Figured it was okay since she didn’t specify the location had to be on this planet. I got an A and note in red from the teacher telling me how creative I was! It felt good.

I rocked out some fun papers in college and I blogged for a year or so, but until I started this project … I guess I didn’t take myself seriously.

Tell us about your writing process.

So far, I’m a pantser. For Memoirs of a Girl Who Loves God, I just started writing. I was inspired by someone close to me and the story just came to me. But when you’re writing, you think about your characters all the time. So in my head, I knew where I was taking the story.  I just didn’t know how I was going to get there until I was at my computer – actively writing.

I tried to do an outline for my current WIP, but so far it’s not working for me. I have to just think it out and write it.

I totally understand. What is your favorite genre … to read … to write?

My favorite genre  to write is Faith & Spirituality. But, I love to read all kinds of books. I love YA Fiction, Faith Fiction, Historical, Romance every now and again, Suspense, Thrillers …

What are you passionate about?

Animals-I will be any animal’s advocate. One day I hope to open an animal shelter

If you lived here in Alaska, you could become a dog musher. What is something you cannot live without?

God first. My family. Then air, water, food… those are important too. J

I like the order. When you are not writing, what do you do?

Publishing. Seriously, getting this book out has consumed my life. It’s a lot of work. There are so many steps, but God has made sure I could handle it all. I’ve met some amazing people. My editors, formatter, cover people, bloggers, and the WEBSITE. Oh my goodness, God sent me help for my website. I almost threw my laptop out the window trying to deal with that. I’m okay now though, lol.

Where do you get the inspiration for your novels?

Memoirs is my first, but I always go back to God on this. As writers, we all draw from our life experiences. Once you need to write something else in, it’s time for research.

What sort of research do you do for your novels?

All kinds. Sometimes you just need Google. But for Memoirs, I visited our local homeless shelter and took a tour. I spoke with and interviewed soldiers and asked a million questions. It’s important to ensure what is being written is reflective of real life. This isn’t a fantasy book so if someone who has self-harmed picked it up or a soldier who was in Desert Storm, I want them to relate.  Now each person’s individual experience will vary… For instance, one of the soldiers I spoke with who was in Desert Storm was in a troop who was right in all the action. Their access to water was limited. Another soldier whose troop wasn’t in the thick of the action said they had plenty of water. So much of it, in fact, that they were building houses with the bottles when they were bored.

Do you have a special place where you write?

Not yet. I desperately want a special place to write. Right now, our home is very small and though it’s just the two of us with our pets, we need more room.

Do you write from an outline or are you a discovery writer?  Why?

More discovery in the details. With Memoirs, I knew where I was going, but needed the ‘discovery’ aspect to get there.

Do you head-hop?

I do. It was out of control for a minute, but my super-duper content editor whipped me into shape. So now I do it, but appropriately. No Dramamine needed.

I’m going to drop you in a remote Alaska cabin for a month. It’s summer so you don’t have to worry about freezing to death. I’ll supply the food and the mosquito spray. What do you do while you’re there and what do you bring with you? If you’re bringing books, what are they?

Oh, this is easy. I will explore, of course. It’s a must to be aware of your surroundings. But I would take that time to write. I would love to have a whole month to myself with no other obligations… such a dream. I would probably stick to reading before bed. That’s how I get my reading time in now. I would take some of my favourite movies for down time. But I bet I could write an entire book in a month under those circumstances.

Talk about your book.

Memoirs of a Girl Who Loves God took me two years to write because of… well, life. My inspiration for the story was based on someone very close to me. She was very open and honest about her experiences and I drew all I could from her.

Was it your intention to write a story with a message or a moral?

I didn’t think of it that way in the beginning. Not in a literal sense. I never said, ‘I’m going to write this to give hope to those who have self-harmed or…’  But my moral in life… real-life, is all about showing God’s love. So if I decide to write a book, I certainly want God’s love built-in.

What do you want readers to think or feel after reading one of your books?

I want people to read it and have a new or renewed sense of how much God loves them. My characters are not far fetched. They’re out there. They exist in someone and when we are looking for them, we’ll find them.

What influenced your decision to self-publish?

Research. I did a ton of research and reading. I’m still so new that there are some things I can’t make heads or tails of. But it appears that traditional publishers don’t operate the way they used to. The market has changed drastically with ebooks and self-publishing so publishers have been forced to change with it. I wasn’t sure I wanted to invest another couple of years in finding an agent and then publisher. I’m a pretty good people person and as for marketing, I will try a hundred things that don’t work to find the one thing that does. So in the end I decided to self-publish and I think I’m glad I did.

There are people who believe that traditional publishing is on the ropes, that self-publishing is the future. Do you agree? Why?

I can see why people say that. While self-publishing has put a huge dent in the market, I still think traditional publishers have their place. Who doesn’t want to be signed by a ‘big dog’ and get an advance… have someone else take care of all your editing needs and pour money into promoting you?

What do you find to be the greatest advantage of self-publishing?

Having 100% control over your own success or failure. That can be good and bad. You have to be a go-getter. You can’t just write it and put any humdrum cover on it and hope people are going to buy it. You have to take it seriously, make it the best it can be, and then market forever. If you don’t plan market your own book, you may want to consider trying the traditional way.

What do you think self-published authors might be missing out on?

Less stress. Don’t get me wrong; I know that authors who are signed with traditional publishers have their own stress. Deadlines for one thing. But! A traditional publisher handles a lot of expenses and if you received a decent advance, you’re not working a 9-to-5. That alone is a dreamy thought.

As a self-published author who also works a day job, you won’t get an argument from me. With the number of self-published books increasing by such a huge rate, it is really difficult for authors to make their books stand out. How do you go about this?

Yes. I’ll do it anyway. I will try those hundred things. As long as I’m trying I know God will open the right doors at the right time.

Who designed your book cover/s?

A lot of people, lol. I took the photo for it and commissioned Zei Llamas to create the cover. Much of the idea for design came from my spouse. He’s quite creative in ways I’m not and I’m so glad. Zei really brought the ideas to life. Victorine Lieske gave the title/font a facelift and Carey Bradshaw polished it until it shined.

 

 

Do you believe that self-published authors can produce books as high-quality as the traditional published? If so, how do you think we should go about that?

 

Absolutely. It’s harder for us, but it’s important to do it right. If you’re writing anything you ever plan or hope to have published then you need to network. It’s time consuming but it’s a must. You have to make connections and meet people who know all the things you don’t. Find groups on Facebook to be a part of and get on twitter and meet people. Talk to them. Make real friends. You never know what can come from it. I’m in a group on Facebook called Clean Indie Reads (CIR) and they are the best! I can’t rave about them enough. I wouldn’t be this far without the folks I’ve met in that one group.

 

 

Do you write specifically for a Christian audience? Why or why not?

 

No, definitely not. I write what I love and I happen to love God so that will come through.

 

What are some of the special challenges of being a Christian writer?

There’s no special challenge for me. I’ve never looked at it like that. I don’t write to appease any group of people. I love God, but I’m not into religious titles. I don’t mean that sound rude, but I want to be real. I don’t hide the fact I love God but at the same time, mainstream Christianity isn’t something I cater to.

 

 

We’re in total agreement on that subject. Christians are told to be “in the world, but not of it.” As a Christian writer, how do you write to conform to that scripture?

 

Anyone who really loves God and is working on his or her relationship with God is already on the right path. You will be set apart by being real and loving and kind.

 

 

Do you feel that Christian writers are expected to conform to some standards that are perhaps not realistic to the world?

 

Yes, probably so. But we have to push against that. I’m not writing to be in a Christian writing club of some sort. If you can’t be real about what you write and what you believe, then you shouldn’t bother.

 

 

Do you feel that Christian writers should focus on writing really great stories or on presenting the gospel clearly in everything they write? Or is it possible to do both?

I think if a writer is a Christian, they should write like any other writer. They should listen to their heart and focus on their craft and write amazing stories. If you write a story and you’re focused on external expectations, then you’re writing will not be true to you.

 

If you write speculative fiction, do you find that the Christian reader community is accepting of that genre?

I haven’t written it, but I’m not saying I never will.

Some will be accepting and some won’t. But who cares? The only one you’ll ever have to really answer to is God. Mainstream Christianity has got to stop finding ways to point fingers. If all believers would just focus on God, we’d be so much better off. If someone writes something I don’t like, I don’t read it. It’s that simple.

 

Where can readers find you and your books?

http://www.amazon.com/Memoirs-Girl-Who-Loves-God-ebook/dp/B0100W0G7O/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1434749113&sr=1-1&keywords=Memoirs+of+a+Girl+Who+Loves+God

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/552520

Fourteen-year-old Krystal finds herself flailing when her parents separate. Unable to cope, she begins cutting. No one knows.

At her new school, she makes one single friend, Em, who invites her to volunteer at the local homeless shelter. There, Krystal discovers fellow misfits, including Brandon, a boy from her school. How can Krystal start a new life when the scars of her old one will never fully heal?

What readers are saying about “Memoirs of a Girl Who Loves God”

“This is a heartwarming story that was written from the heart. It brought real meaning to me––of some things in life––that never made sense before. It made me smile, and also brought tears to my eyes. This is a must read. I wasn’t able to put it down once I started.”

“A compelling story that will have readers touched and unable to put it down. I’ve read it more than once and each and every time it brings tears to my eyes.”

“WOW!  It is not an easy book to read, but it is a powerful book. Heartbreaking, heartwarming, challenging and uplifting.”

Connect with C.L. Wells

Facebook – facebook.com/Author.CLWELLS

Twitter – twitter.com/clwellsauthor

Website – theclwells.com

Blog – http://theclwells.com/ramblings

Newsletter – http://theclwells.com/newsletter

e-Mail – clwells.author@gmail.com

Additional contact information for C.L. Wells

Interview with KC Sprayberry   3 comments

Today’s interview is with K.C. Sprayberry. Welcome to the blog.  Tell us something about yourself.

Sprayberry EyesI currently live in Northwest Georgia, but that will be changing soon. We’re in the process of selling our home and relocating to Alabama. Not only am I an author, I’m also the editor-in-chief of Summer Solstice Publishing, an imprint of Solstice Publishing. My significant other is my husband of nearly twenty-two years and the only child remaining in our almost empty nest is our youngest, who will be returning to college in a year.

At what point did you know you wanted to be a writer?

As far back as I can remember, I have loved reading. I think that came from my mom, who in an effort to control six unruly children over school holidays, was wont to sit us down with a book in our hands and order us to read. We all developed a deep-seated passion for those books and many others that continues to this day. Sometime during this process, I began to create stories in my head. At first, I put these tales into my diary, until one of my brothers discovered it and blabbed. After that, I kept the stories in my head, until high school, where a very good creative writing teacher pulled that magical string and let them loose. Since then, I’ve been jotting down stories on pieces of paper, napkins, even my hand when I was without a piece of paper. It’s like the faucet will never close, and I aim to make the most of this journey.

Sprayberry callchronicleskindlecoverThat’s a common history for many of us writers … that tap that cannot be turned off.  Tell us about your writing process.

My writing process generally consists of me yelling at the characters demanding to be heard while I attempt to do those normal things—prepare meals, tote the child here and there, and clean the house. They won’t shut up, so I’ll plop down and pound out their stories, until the dust bunnies are of Jurassic size, and then do the normal things until the characters are too loud again. It’s a vicious circle I can’t, and don’t want to escape.

What is your favorite genre … to read … to write?

It might be easier to ask what is my least favorite genre. I will read a book as long as it’s good. It’s that simple. Be it fantasy, contemporary, romance, sci-fi, or any of the other genres, as long as the author has created a wonderful, consuming story that I can’t walk away from. There are exceptions though. I don’t read porn, have no use for it, and literary fiction leaves me cold. Most literary fiction I’ve attempted to read bored me to tears within the first ten pages.

Sprayberry lost and scared cover artWhat are you passionate about?

Writing, reading, photography, nature, honesty in politics. Yes, I know the last one is a bit of a laugh, but I feel that politicians should be honest with those who have elected them. That’s probably why I’m not too popular with that group.

What is something you cannot live without?

A quiet place to write… my books (we have close to 3,000 print and ebooks)… my kitchen—cooking is my way of relaxing. As one of my children recently described it, “I don’t know how much she puts of what into the pot. She just tosses this and that, and it all comes out great.”

Sprayberry Softly Say GoodbyeWhen you are not writing, what do you do?

Visit the library… a park… smell the flowers outside… meet up with people I like. I’m a simple person. There’s no need for a fancy meal, or an elite gathering. Give me down home folks and good food, and I’m enjoying myself.

Have you written any books that made a transformative effect on you? If so, in what way?

My most recent novel, Lost & Scared, and my latest collection, Soar High 1 Standing Strong.

The novel, Lost & Scared, is about non-custodial parental abduction told from the viewpoint of twins, a brother and sister, with an almost mystical connection. One of them is left behind, while the other is taken in the abduction with three of their younger siblings. It’s intense, explores a lot of emotions and actions I’ve avoided in my other teen novels, and as my editor put it, is a darned good book.

Soar High 1 Standing Strong is a series of stories about abuse. It’s about overcoming abuse more than about the actions themselves. Freeing those being abused from their situation is more than mouthing words, it’s about action, doing what others may say is wrong, but still taking that step to walk away from the pattern so it doesn’t hold onto you forever.

Sprayberry Where U @Where do you get the inspiration for your novels?

Things happening around me, news stories, situations I experienced growing up and as an adult. Sometimes a character will appear in my head and demand that I tell a story I’ve never considered. Those are harder to write, but far more satisfying, especially the research I do to find out more about the situation I’m crafting.

What sort of research do you do for your novels?

Newspapers, the internet, talking to people who have experienced what I’m writing about, or who know someone who has gone through it. Sometimes, to craft a great story, you have to step away from the characters and envision things how their friends see them. That’s why it’s important to get the opinion of bystanders.

If someone who hasn’t read any of your novels asked you to describe your writing, what would you say?

I’m intense and approach subjects that aren’t comfortable. Things like underage drinking, school violence, texting and driving, non-custodial parental abduction, and bullying to name a few. Some say those are hot subjects, but I try to look at them from a viewpoint that hasn’t been done before.

Do you have a special place where you write?

I have a writing cave. It’s a private place, where those in the house know they can’t wander into at will. I’ll also write in a notebook at the park, or sitting in the bleachers before a game, or even at the grocery store if the muse strikes.

Do you find yourself returning to any recurring themes within your writing and, if so, are you any closer to finding an answer?

Currently, I’m returning to the non-custodial parental abduction theme. Lost & Scared 2 is in the early planning stages. There are a couple of chapters written, but I’m still researching a few elements that I don’t really know well, so those characters are well rounded. I have to say this book will portray the original twins in a completely different way as the first book, which is why I’m having so much trouble getting it to work. They’ve matured, are getting ready for college, and still dealing with the near past. And that’s all I can say about that book at the moment.

Are you a plot driven or character driven writer? Why?

Character driven, definitely. My characters are very much a part of my life. They feel the same as my kids. I care about them. I cry when they do, laugh with them, and fight for the same things they believe in. Well-developed characters can move a plot so well, and I strive hard to do that with mine.

Do you write from an outline or are you a discovery writer?  Why?

I’m a panster through and through. I’ve tried writing from an outline, but it never works. Before I reach chapter eight, I’m tossing everything out the window and listening to my characters, switching up situations, letting the plot take off on its own.

Sprayberry Take Chances (683x1024)What point of view do you prefer to write, and why?

For my teen books, I prefer first person, present tense. It’s more alive, contains more a feeling of immediacy. Romance, military fiction, and westerns are all third person, past tense. That’s how the story wants to be told, and I learned long ago not to ignore the story.

Do you head-hop?

I try not to. Some of my stories have that happen accidentally, but mostly I stick to the point of view I’m working with at the moment. Do I have multiple POV stories? Yes. Two of my teen books, my romantic suspense novel, and my western are all multiple POV, but I work hard to ensure the reader isn’t confused about whose story they’re reading.

I’m going to drop you in a remote Alaska cabin for a month. It’s summer so you don’t have worry about freezing to death. I’ll supply the food and the mosquito spray. What do you do while you’re there and what do you bring with you? If you’re bringing books, what are they?

Better be some really good mosquito spray. I’m a magnet for those critters, and I hear the ones in Alaska are huge!

The huge ones are easy. They’ve very slow, so you can smack them before they get to you. It’s the smaller ones that attack with ferocity and by the millions. But we have great bug spray.

You’ll supply the food too? Will it be food I don’t have to prepare? Because if so, I’ll be spending that whole month doing a NaNoWriMo type writing marathon with one major difference. I won’t have to stop to grocery shop, or make meals, or clean the house. You might have to use a shoehorn to boot me out after a month.

Tell us about your books.

We’ll start with the first. Softly Say Goodbye was inspired by a Breaking Benjamin song, Here We Are. The moment I heard that song, the characters came alive in my head. The plot and theme were a lot slower, until I settled on underage drinking and one girl’s passion to stop teens in her school from going down that road.

Take Chances is probably the second most emotional book for me. This idea began right after Columbine. That really hit home for my family. We knew people there, people I’d worked with before we moved to Georgia. Watching the news stories, seeing the terror drove home just how awful this is. The main character, Julie, is a military brat, and proud of it. She has her secrets, one of which is revealed the day before horror visits her at a school a second time.

Sprayberry The Wrong One 2 (427x640)The Wrong One is my first multiple viewpoint story. Two children are ripped apart in a night of terror when they are four. Fourteen years later, the boy, Kyle, stands by his vow to bring Lyssa home. Lyssa doesn’t even know who she really is, due to a threat made in the early hours after she was taken from her home. This book is my first psychological thriller, but not my last. The Wrong One placed #7 in the 2013 Preditors & Editors Readers Poll.

Inits—it’s all in a name, or as Alex puts it in this book, the inits, initials, of your name. And his are a curse word. He’s tried for years to stop punching people who use his inits, but now that he’s starting high school, he knows he has to find a peaceful way to stop the teasing. Only one person stands in his way, the school bully, who is determined to make Alex get over his inits and let people use them.

Texting and driving is the theme for Where U @, but the book is much more than that. It also explores some racism, where the main character, Trea, must put up with harassment because she’s one quarter Cherokee. As she discovers, it’s easy to say don’t text and drive, but the temptation might prove too strong at certain moments.

Canoples Investigations Tackles Space Pirates is the first in a planned 6 book series about a group of teens living on a space station. It’s irreverent, funny, and full of all kinds of dangerous situations—the perfect book for adventuresome boys and girls. Oh, and there are space pirates, with one big surprise for BD Bradford, the main character.

Canoples Investigations Versus Spacers Rule, there’s a new gang making trouble on Canoples Station, along with a lot of hatred for the Canoples Investigations crew. Can they overcome all of that to protect the station from dangerous animals and… gasp!… gas?

Paradox Lost: Their Path is a time travel fantasy novel. What starts out as a prophecy that will happen sometime in the future, turns into a fight for their lives for triplets DJ, Matt, and Elisa. To compound the problems, each of them must make the choice to save their father, trapped in the debris of 1906 San Francisco after the earthquake, thereby changing history and causing more problems. Or will they put their personal concerns aside and work for the more important issue, stopping Rogues from destroying the world? Paradox Lost: Their Path placed #3 in the 2014 Preditors & Editors Readers Poll.

The Curse of Grungy Gulley, a tale that has been with me for a long time. It originally started out as another “dead mother” book, but evolved into a good versus evil fight spanning 144 years, with four viewpoints. Three teens must overcome a Bewitcher who has been harrying their families since the time of The Black Plague in fourteenth century Europe.

How do you stop a stalker who is determined to possess you? That’s what Lisa faces in Evil Eyes. This book is also about teens experiencing new feelings of closeness with their significant other once they’re off in college, away from a protective home environment.

Lost & Scared is my most recent YA novel, and the most intense writing experience I’ve ever had. The theme is non-custodial parental abduction from the viewpoint of twins, a boy and a girl. Each of them originally has the same reason to exhibit disgust for their dad, but they find themselves being tested beyond what they thought were their limits as the story unfolds. This book isn’t for the faint of heart.

What if you had a chance to ride in the Pony Express? What if you were a girl and this was your dream? That’s the theme of Pony Dreams, a book set in mid-nineteenth century Nevada. Abby will do anything to get near the ponies, even thinks about sneaking away from home to join the new mail venture.

Westerns have always had a special place in my heart. The Call Chronicles 1: The Griswold Gang was an experiment that I suggested to The Western Online. This book was actually first published on their website as a serialized novel, much like the penny dreadfuls of the nineteenth century. It’s about a family who has a duty to find and bring to the justice the men who burned their home and murdered their parents.

What would you do if your daughter allegedly committed suicide but you are certain she didn’t? That’s what Jayme and Brad face in Starlight, a romantic suspense novel about corruption.

*** I do have short stories, collections, and anthologies along with my novels, but in the interest of space, I didn’t include them. ***

Was it your intention to write a story with a message or a moral?

It never starts out that way, but the subject matter I deal with usually ends with a message. Honestly, I really try hard to avoid being preachy about those messages.

What do you want readers to think or feel after reading one of your books?

I want them to get mad, to cry, to laugh, to think of my characters as they would their family or friends. I would love my readers to be so involved in the book that they are screaming for a win during a game, beating the armrest of their chair when things go wrong, or hiccupping from sobbing at a very intense moment.

Social Media Links:

Amazon Author Central: http://www.amazon.com/KC-Sprayberry/e/B005DI1YOU

Twitter: https://twitter.com/kcsowriter

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/KC-Sprayberry/331150236901202

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5011219.K_C_Sprayberry

Website: http://www.kcsprayberry.com/

Blog: http://outofcontrolcharacters.blogspot.com/

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/

Authorgraph: https://www.authorgraph.com/authors/kcsowriter

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/kcsprayberry/

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=18984155&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile

Manic Readers: http://www.manicreaders.com/KCSprayberry/

AUTHORSdb: http://authorsdb.com/authors-directory/5230-k-c-sprayberry

Amazon Book List: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=k.c.%20sprayberry&sprefix=k.c.+%2Cdigital-text

Book Links:

Softly Say Goodbye: getBook.at/B00I10UNY4

Take Chances: getBook.at/B00FIOX1MW

The Wrong One: getBook.at/B00GSSW5T2

Inits: getBook.at/B00M4RQ74K

Where U @ myBook.to/B00HZTT4LK

Canoples Investigations Tackles Space Pirates: myBook.to/B00HZTT4LK

Canoples Investigations Versus Spacers Rule: getBook.at/B00RBVDC4C

Paradox Lost: Their Path: getBook.at/B00PB735LI

The Curse of Grungy Gulley: getBook.at/B00O29F6AE

Evil Eyes: getBook.at/B00J1QC3V8

Lost & Scared: getBook.at/B00TXJ48FC

Pony Dreams: getBook.at/B00HTQNE7Y

The Call Chronicles 1: The Griswold Gang: getBook.at/B00NAA7GXG

Starlight: viewBook.at/B00K2IMHOM

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