Archive for the ‘#trump’ Tag

Why Do We Focus on A Person Instead of What Matters?   1 comment

When Bill Clinton was president,  he was taking the country in a direction that many of us were uncomfortable with. This created push-back. The conservative movement had been around for a long time as a group of writers and commentators who mostly talked among themselves, but hadn’t real political power over the 20 years of its existence. In the prior few years since Reagan had set aside the decidedly-unfair Fairness Doctrine, conservative talk radio had given them a larger voice and wakened up a lot of people to the difference between what they valued and what Bill Clinton wanted.

Image result for image of donald trumpThe conservative push-back against Bill Clinton resulted in the Republican takeover of the House of Representatives for the first time since 1940. And for a brief exciting time, we saw principles being discussed. As a young mother struggling to raise our daughter while my husband was in school, it was exciting to hear that those on welfare would now be expected to work if they wanted to receive benefits and that there would be limits set on how long they could receive those benefits. I could hope my taxes (what the government was stealing from my paycheck to give to these deadbeats — and yeah, they were deadbeats) might go down eventually.

But something happened. The conversation shifted from principles (reducing government, spending less, taxing less, taking responsibility for your own life) to a person – Bill Clinton. Make no mistake, Bill Clinton isn’t a good guy. He’s a sexual predator. There’s certainly been plenty of evidence looked at and ignored over the years that he and Hillary are crooks. That is not my point. I want to understand why we started talking about what he was doing while president rather than about how his policies were affecting us and why we needed to change those policies?

I think it has something to do with the danger to the State of that line of thinking. The last thing any president wants is to have his power curtailed and that’s where the conservative conversation would have eventually led. As people rediscovered the Founders and read the Constitution, people were beginning to understand that the power of the presidency had grown incredibly over the last 100 years. And understanding that might lead to the people demanding the presidency be scaled back to Founding Era power levels.

The co-opting of the conservative movement was subtle and it certainly had help from Bill Clinton’s sexual immorality, but we’ve not really moved beyond that dynamic. When Bush 2 was president, the liberal-progressives mostly talked about him. They hated him, even though it is hard to see why. He expanded federal control over the local education systems. He expanded Medicare. He gave them a lot of pet projects they’d been dreaming of since the 1994 Contract of America had set them back on their heels. But despite him giving them what they wanted, they hated him.

The other day on Twitter someone posted that “evangelical Christians have gotten over Trump’s sinful ways, but they still haven’t gotten over Obama being black.” I called baloney on that. I never cared about Obama being black. I don’t know any (white) evangelical Christians who are racists and cared about the color of his skin. They objected to his policies and you can be against the policies of a president without it being racial. Obama’s policies STANK for the middle- and working-classes. We were drowning and he was throwing us anchors that shut down the businesses that paid us to work for them rather than lifelines that would keep us afloat until the economy recovered. That had nothing to do with the color of his skin and everything to do with how his policies were affecting us.

So, now Donald Trump is president. I don’t like him personally (which is why I didn’t vote for him). But some of his policies seem to have had a great effect on the economy and that helps many evangelical Christians who are working- and -middle-class. So many of them are willing to ignore who he is as a person and support him because of his policies. Heck, if this economy continues, he might get my vote in 2020.

But probably not simply because there are other policies of his that I object to and I am a policy voter. I didn’t vote for Mitt Romney because his policies didn’t match my values. Did I think he would be better for the economy than Barack Obama? No, not really. He would have gone even further into Obamacare and probably tweaked it so it “succeeded”  until most people began to think they couldn’t live without it. I’m all about people being responsible for themselves, so I didn’t like Mitt Romney, the Republican socialist, so I didn’t vote for him.

I do have a point with this post. The problem with politics is not really with who we have in the White House. It’s taken a long time for me to get to this place, but I’ve come to understand that the presidency itself is the problem with government and has been pretty much from the beginning. It has too much power. It can write its own laws through executive orders. It has so many loopholes where it doesn’t have to work with Congress to get things done. It doesn’t matter if there’s a Republican in the office or a Democrat. Both have too much power and they follow policies that harm people. It’s a problem with the Institution of the Presidency not with the guy or gal who sits in the leather seat behind the nice desk in the uniquely shaped office.

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What If You Passed A Test … And Nobody Cared?   Leave a comment

I like tests. Puzzles fascinate me. I don’t even mind cognitive tests because I used to work for a mental health agency and so they don’t scare me.

Image result for image of trump's cognitive test resultsThe news that President Trump passed a mental acuity test was welcome news. I think the country is better off if the president doesn’t have Alzheimer’s. And a 30 out of 30 score indicates that he doesn’t.

By the way, most 71-year-olds could not score a 30 out of 30. In fact, many people in their middle-years would struggle with reverse serial sevens. I can’t pass that particular one without counting on my fingers. How do I know? Brad, Keirnan and I took the test last night.

Keirnan is 19 and suffers from bipolar, so he’s been through this test once before — and scored a 30 out of 30. The doctor was so amazed that he could do reverse serial sevens from 100 into the negatives that he just let him go until Keirnan said he needed water to continue. The kid has a diagnosed mental illness, but he doesn’t have dementia or any other sort of cognitive disorder. And bipolar, with appropriate medication, doesn’t really negatively affect his life. It’s just something he has to manage – like if you have diabetes or asthma. That attitude toward mental illness as a condition that can be managed comes from familiarity with mental illness.

Brad sucks at remembering sequences of numbers. So do I. I often can’t remember a phone number long enough to dial it — which is why I write them down — and have since I was about 15 years old. I passed the immediate recall on the assessment and the delayed recall because I knew it was important to remember them. Brad, however, flunked the delayed recall question. It doesn’t mean he has dementia. He didn’t flunk the assessment overall, just that one section.

I didn’t do so well on the tap for the letter A. It’s deliberately hard and none of us did well on it, though we all passed. Keirnan almost lost a point on it because Brad was saying the letters way too fast and he made two errors which is still allowable to get a perfect score.

So, the results of our tests mean very little. It was a fun exercise and we now understand what President Trump was tested on. We know that none of the four of us has dementia.

Well, our family knows that, but I think we knew it before we took the test. President Trump’s supporters are probably relieved that what they thought was true has been proven true, but his detractors don’t care.

“Well, this is a really easy test,” someone on the radio said while I was brushing my teeth this morning.

Yeah, if you’re mentally fit, it is an easy test. If you have dementia, it’s not.

“There are other tests that would show his mental fitness better.”

Yeah. there are. If I were President Trump, I’d request a full psychological assessment. They take about two hours and they include some of the same questions as the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. They would detect mental illness such as bipolar, schizophrenia and major depression and they would also indicate whether screening for personality disorders is in order.

I don’t think anyone seriously believes a successful businessman in his 70s has been a schizophrenic for decades. But that doesn’t matter to his detractors. Even if he took a full psychological assessment, they’d insist the results were wrong. And of course, they’d insist he be assessed for “Narcissistic Personality Disorder”.

Let’s talk about that for a moment. First, it’s not a disease. It’s a spectrum of personality traits. Most people fall somewhere on the scale. I took the assessment and I scored in the bottom 30. I took the test as if I were Donald Trump and he scores pretty high on the scale. According to the psychiatrists I worked with, so does Barack Obama and George W. Bush, Lincoln, George Washington, John F. Kennedy, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Angela Merkel, Elon Musk, every psychiatrist except the one you’re speaking to at the moment, and almost all of the actors in Hollywood.

Basically, anyone with any self-esteem at all will score at least at the lower end of the scale. That doesn’t mean they are crippled by NPD. It means they know their worth and there’s nothing wrong with that. If they don’t know their worth, there’s another personality disorder they might qualify for.

People who aspire to be President of the United States typically score in the top 70% of this scale. Why? Because it takes a lot of chutzpah to believe you can be one of the most powerful people in the world and do the job competently. Some of these narcissists were so certain they’re right that they declared independence from Britain and founded a whole new country. Others decide to challenge NASA in the space race or create a company that dominates the tech world. A narcissist found a way to stop the scourge of polio. Some day a series of narcissists will cure cancer. Narcissism, evidenced by the belief that God was on her side, allowed Mother Theresa to minister to the poor of Calcutta and eventually be named a saint.

Look behind almost every successful and well-known person and you will find a degree of narcissism. But that doesn’t matter to Trump’s detractors. They don’t see that their own idols were often as narcissistic or more than the object of their Derangement Syndrome. They don’t care what the truth is, they only want what they want …

Which is itself a sign of scoring pretty high on the Narcissistic Personality Disorder spectrum.

Yeah. It doesn’t surprise me that it’s mostly the young and liberal who hate Trump to the degree that they don’t care what the tests say about his mental fitness. Baby boomers, who themselves scored higher than their parents on the scale of narcissism, raised a generation of raging narcissists. Everywhere you turn, you find scores of people who believe they have a “right” to other people’s stuff because they’re “special.” That narcissistic trait is a liberal ideal and I find most liberals to be at least moderately narcissistic. They believe they know better than everyone else how we all should live our lives and they cannot be dissuaded from that belief. They will do anything to force others to comply with what they consider to be best practices.

So, maybe it’s not surprising that they are allergic to everything Donald Trump does. Narcissists usually can’t stand to be in the room with other narcissists. It steals the limelight from them. It explains, to a certain degree, the conservative opposition to Barack Obama, himself a raging narcissist. Conservatives also believe that they know better than everyone else how we should all live our lives. It pissed them off that Obama thought he knew better.

Which brings the question — in this day where nobody knows humility, can anyone actually lead us? And should they try?

My fear is that a society of narcissists would have a good deal of trouble staying out of each other’s business without a government to impose some boundaries and, yet, as long as they have a government, they will seek to use it to insinuate themselves into everyone’s business.

Regulatory Reducing Diet   Leave a comment

The last Western Union telegram was sent 11 years ago. Why? Because technology outstripped its usefulness a long time ago. But the FCC recently decided to end burdensome regulations that stifled telegraph technology. As Reuters reported:

 

AT&T Inc, originally known as the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, in 2013 lamented the FCC’s failure to formally stop enforcing some telegraph rules.

‘Regulations have a tendency to persist long after they outlived any usefulness and it takes real focus and effort to ultimately remove them from the books even when everyone agrees that it is the common sense thing to do,’ the company said.”

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Regulations are far easier to create than they are to dismantle, yet there has been an undeniable trend of repealing these types of regulations lately. We haven’t seen anything like it since the Reagan administration. Who is responsible for this housecleaning? None other than President Donald Trump.

 

Ronald Reagan left many legacies during his duration in the White House. I could grumble out his contribution to the War on Drugs, but I’m going to focus on his deregulatory accomplishments.  During the Reagan administration, both the Federal Register and federal regulations decreased by more than one-third. That’s a pretty impressive record, considering most presidents increase regulation, but Donald Trump has already shattered that record.

Yes, he’s been in office less than a year and has already accomplished more on this front than Reagan did in eight years. Upon taking office, Donald Trump signed an executive order telling federal agencies that they must cut two existing regulations for each new regulation proposed. Contained within this executive order was the demand that each federal agency create a task force with the explicit purpose of finding regulations worth slashing. This act was intended to help the newly sworn-in president reach his promise of cutting 70% of all federal regulations.

Regulatory cuts are typical GOP rhetoric, but the left immediately set about to fight this executive order. A coalition of left-leaning organizations even joined together in February to sue Trump on the grounds that his executive order would potentially “block or force the repeal of regulations needed to protect health, safety, and the environment, across a broad range of topics – from automobile safety, to occupational health, to air pollution, to endangered species.”

Trump doesn’t scare easily. He’s an old hand at lawsuits. He’s continued forward with his objective.

The score speaks for itself. During the same point of time of their respective presidencies, Obama’s regulatory tally was at 1,737 while Trump’s is 1,241. And while Reagan’s own regulatory cuts were admirable, they still don’t compare with Trump’s if you judge them by the same time frame.

Earlier this October, Trump announced his plans to further cut taxes along with red tape that negatively impacts both businesses and consumers. According to CEI, the current level of federal regulatory burdens have amounted to nearly $2 trillion. Business owners pay the initial costs, but regulatory burden inevitably trickles down to the consumer. When overhead costs are raised on entrepreneurs, the cost must be made up somewhere. These hidden costs account for about $15,000 per household in any given year.

As the 2017 fiscal year came to a close this month, the White House also released its initiative to cut more red tape to jump start the economy. Obviously, the “do nothing” method is a far cry from Obama’s overbearing regulatory intervention. This is pleasing Trump supporters, the business sector and economics geeks like me who are fed up with a decade of economic stagnation, but recognize that Congress has yet to act on any substantial reform in either the House or the Senate. This is all being done by executive order. Regulations, by the way, are the one area where Presidents may act without the advise and consent of Congress. Regulations are an Executive Branch function.

The White House has continued its efforts to encourage regulatory relief by pushing for three specific reform efforts, listed by CEI’s Clyde Wayne Crews as follows:

  1. Trump’s January executive order requiring agencies to eliminate at least two rules for every new regulation adopted, and that they ensure net new regulatory costs of zero;
  2. A sweeping  Reorganization Executive Order that requires the Office of Management and Budget to submit a plan aimed at streamlining and reducing the size of the administrative state generally. This plan will set the tone for Trump’s budget proposal next year.
  3. memorandum from the new Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) administrator Neomi Rao directing agencies, for the first time as far as I can tell, to propose an overall incremental regulatory cost allowance for the agency in the new edition of their “Unified Agenda” on regulations. This report will appear in the fall. Prior editions, since the 1980s, would label rules as “economically significant,” but never has there been such a “regulatory budget.” Rao says, “OMB expects that each agency will propose a net reduction in total incremental regulatory costs for FY 2018.”

So, let me guess – you haven’t heard about this, right? That’s because the media have largely ignored it. Yeah, they never miss an opportunity to criticize President Trump, but somehow this massive rollback of regulation has escaped their notice.

 

Without economic liberty there can be no general freedom, which is why a decrease in the regulatory state is so important. There are many areas where I deeply disagree with President Trump, but increasing economic freedom is no small feat and it deserves a standing ovation. 

A Trumpian Week   Leave a comment

Image result for image of trumpRegular readers of this blog know that I didn’t vote for either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton and that I think politics are not among the solutions to our problems. I try to dish up a steady fare of political philosophy here — to give people an understanding of what’s going on and where we ought to be headed rather than a Republican or Democratic line of bull. I’m a non-partisan, conservative-leaning, libertarian. When I say “conservative”, it doesn’t mean I’ve stepped back from the radical notion that liberty is better than tradition. It simply means my default position is that idiots (otherwise known as politicians) shouldn’t strive to make big changes in society or government without a full-throated consultation with the people, who are the ones who will be stuck with the consequences. If the people want to make changes, we should be allowed to do it, using the constitutional procedures. Change should always be driven by us, not by the elites who would be our rulers.

But sometimes it’s interesting to look at politics if only for the horror movie aspect of all of it.

This week was a Trumpian week and I’ve got good things to say about my observations as well as bad things to say about them.

First, Mr. Trump, STOP fighting with the widows and parents of fallen soldiers (I refuse to call them “gold star”; maybe I’ll post about that someday). It is entirely possible that the wife of La David Johnson got your conversation with her wrong. She had the congresswoman there to help her misinterpret what you said and she doesn’t seem like a person who screens what a trusted elite tells her. I get why that’s annoying, but you’re not doing yourself or anyone else any good by having a public feud with her. Maybe if you’d just go after the congresswoman, who SOOO needs to have a verbal ass-kicking, but leave the widow alone. At the risk of sounding partisan here – when you deal with Democrats and make them look stupid, your polls rise. When you pick on military widows, your polls drop. Be sensible, Mr. President.

Second, Mr. Trump, thank you for taking the opioid crisis seriously and compassionately. Last night’s speech spoke of fighting a disease with treatment rather than incarceration. I suspected you would up to this task, given your family background, but I held my breath, concerned that you would declare another “war on drugs” that has proven to be absolutely fruitless for the past 40 years. I am a little concerned about your announcement that you’ve given all branches of the federal government wide leeway to address this issue. The federal government, more often than not, ignores the constitution and runs roughshod over the rights of individuals. As someone who lives in a state where cannabis has been legalized, I don’t want to see people arrested and imprisoned for partaking of a substance that is no more dangerous than alcohol and there is a risk of federal agencies misinterpreting your executive order to do just that, so I’m going to call that one a mixed bag, depending on the federal interpretation.

Third, Mr. Trump, in case you’re unfamiliar with American history — our Founders fought a war against England in order to secede from what they deemed to be a government that did not represent their values or culture. So, today, when I hear you promise Spain your full support against the people of Catalan who desire to free themselves from a government that doesn’t represent the Catalonians’ values or culture, I wince. It’s just plain wrong! We should be the first nation to step forward in support of liberty as opposed to hegemony.

Fourth, Mr. Trump, I don’t know that you are really the cause of the economic rally that has been underway since you took office. I suspect your presence in the White House, addressing things like the much-needed reform of Obamacare and the tax code; junk-science social engineering like climate change; and overly burdensome economic and environmental regulations on businesses has emboldened investors and other drivers of the economy that have been hiding in underground bunkers during the Obama administration. The growth potential was already there, but you having signaled that you won’t try to crush them if they came out of hiding has given them permission to once more risk.

Nothing works quite like success, so even though your poll numbers are really low, I think if you can stop fighting with people perceived to be underdogs and concentrate on freeing the economy to improve while not inciting wars overseas, you’ll do okay in 2020. I probably still won’t vote for you, but I will applaud your success.

Posted October 27, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in politics, Uncategorized

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How Is the Fix In?   2 comments

So, the other day, someone on Twitter informed me that all Republic states had done away with paper ballots and that no states do hand-counting.

Last I looked Alaska was a Republican-leaning state and I fill out a paper ballot and feed it into a scanner. I’ve seen what comes out at the other end – a scanned copy of my ballot. I’ve seen the poll workers hand-count the ballots to assure they match the reading on the scanner before forwarding a report that verifies that the hand-count matches the scanner count. Then the paper ballots are forwarded in a locked box with guards to the Division of Elections.

Image result for image of russians meddling with election on facebookSo I went out and checked and 37 states have maintained paper ballots, some with optical scanners, others with a paper ballot that prints out after you use the digital machine, and most states that use electronic methods still have some form of paper trail attached.

Amid all of these ridiculous claims was someone up in arms because “Russia used Facebook to influence the election.”

So what?

I used Facebook to influence the election too. I posted on my social media accounts that I thought folks should vote for Gary Johnson rather than the Donald or She-Who-Would-Be-Queen. I offered reasoned arguments that you were free to accept or reject. I pointed out fallacies that you could believe or disbelieve. I posted scathing memes.

Oh, but wait, I’m an American citizen, so it’s okay for me to influence an election, because we all know nobody takes an American citizen seriously, right. But Russia … Russia … oh, my god, Russian agents expressed an opinion and some people might actually have been influenced by finding out that Hillary Clinton thinks the American people are idiots. The horror! And, of course, nobody can exercise their common sense and decide that they disagree with ads posted by Russians because … well, it’s Russia and we all know they have mind-control powers. The horror!

 

We have been subjected to 10 months of propaganda about Trump/Putin election interference without a scrap of actual evidence being produced. It is past time to ask an unasked question: If there were evidence, what is the big deal? All sorts of interest groups try to influence election outcomes including foreign governments. Why is it OK for Israel to influence US elections but not for Russia to do it? I seem to remember Angela Merkel saying something about how she wanted the US election to turn out. Why is it okay for her to do that, but not Vladimir Putin? Why do you think the armament industry, the energy industry, agribusiness, Wall Street and the banks, pharmaceutical companies, what’s left of the Moral Majority, George Soros, etc., supply huge sum of money to finance election campaigns if their intent is not to influence the election? Why do editorial boards write editorials endorsing one candidate and damning another if they are not influencing the election?

What is the difference between influencing the election and influencing the government? Washington is full of lobbyists of all descriptions, including lobbyists for foreign governments, working round the clock to influence the US government. Actual citizens’ opinions are the least represented in the government because we haven’t got any lobbyists working for us.

The orchestrated hysteria over “Russian influence” is even more absurd considering the reason Russia allegedly interfered in the election. Russia favored Trump because he was the “peace” candidate who promised to reduce the high tensions with Russia created by the Obama regime and neocon nazis like Hillary Clinton, Susan Rice, and Samantha Power. What’s wrong with Russia preferring a peace candidate over a war candidate? The American people themselves preferred the peace candidate.

Those who don’t agree with the electorate are the warmongers—the military/security complex and the neocons. These are democracy’s enemies who are trying to overturn the choice of the American people by keeping back information we had a right to know. It is not Russia that disrespects the choice of the American people. Russia is not in our streets throwing rocks through shop windows, burning cars and beating up people who voted for the constitutionally-elected President. Russia is busy dealing with its own issues while the utterly corrupt Democratic National Committee with its divisive identity politics, the military/security complex, and the left-leaning media undermine US democracy.

Whoever is producing the propaganda that these people believe about the election process should probably be looked at as someone trying to influence future election results because it is far easier to hack a nation-wide popular election than it is to corrupt 51 state-wide popular votes conducted by a myriad of election apparatuses.

The important question is who is it that is trying so hard to convince Americans that Russian influence somehow prevailed over our collective commonsense? It would appear that at the most, they released information that allowed us more information upon which to derive our opinions. Are we now saying that an uninformed vote is better than an informed one?

 

 

Actions Speak Louder Than Twitter Storms   Leave a comment

I didn’t vote for Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. I’ve taken some heat for complaining about some of President Trump’s actions and I’ve taken some heat for applauding some of his actions. I don’t care about his Twitter flurries. Those are not governance. Honestly, I find it refreshing that a politician says what’s on his mind before convening a focus group to find out what should be on his mind.

By and large, I was at least half-pleased with President Trump’s cabinet picks. I know lots of people disagree, but they would have disagreed if Trump had allowed Hillary Clinton to pick his cabinet for him. And, no, that’s not a joke. Some people seem to be unfamiliar with how the Constitutional election system works. Donald Trump won the presidency completely by the rules. Maybe your candidate should have not played fast and loose with state secrets on her unsecured private email server and bit her tongue before declaring that 40% of the country’s voters were irredeemable racists she would consign to a “deplorables” basket where she wouldn’t have to take their concerns seriously. You don’t have to be a Donald Trump fan to recognize that she was declaring she would be president for only some Americans. We’re lucky she didn’t win, which does not mean we are blessed that Trump did.

Image result for image secretary elaine chao in alaska

Alaska swung pretty hard to Donald Trump. They didn’t need my help and they didn’t get it, but a lot of people here think they made a right decision because of the Trump administration’s behavior toward Alaska. Since the beginning of the Trump administration, Alaska has been the host to at least three federal department chiefs — Secretaries Rex Tillerson (State), Ryan Zinke (Interior) and Elaine Chao (Transportation). Zinke and Chao came to Alaska at the behest of Alaska’s Congressional delegation. two come quickly to mind, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, who was here a couple of weeks ago.

Both Zinke and Chao toured the state and talked to all walks of Alaskans and then said they hoped to be able to work with the State of Alaska and Alaska residents to develop infrastructure and allow reasonable resource development. Contrast this to the Obama’s administration’s cabinet visits. Antony Foxx (Transportation) and Sally Jewell (Interior) both visited Alaska, but they met only with Native groups, appeared to be hostile to the State government and announced they would further tighten regulations on the state so as to prevent development of infrastructure and further restrict resource development, hobbling our economy even more than the Jones Act and previous environmental regulations already do.

Last week Chao spoke with transportation officials and industry leaders in Alaska, coming to the conclusion that the federal government will more quickly advance projects, which have been delayed, often for decades, by a burdensome regulatory process.

This is no small matter for Alaska, which receives about $500 million annually for its transportation projects through the Federal Highway Administration. Southeast and Southwest Alaska benefit from federal highway funds through limited road projects, but federal funds are used to build Alaska Marine Highway System ships. Like all other states, Alaska matches federal dollars with a 10-percent contribution.

Toward alleviating project delays, Chao noted that Alaska has become only the seventh state to acquire an agreement with the federal government that allows it to conduct environmental reviews for state and federal highway projects. The agreement, which is under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), is expected to be signed in October, according to Chao.

Environmental protections will remain and the federal government will monitor the state’s reviews, but projects should be able to move forward more efficiently.

Actions speak louder than Twitter storms, disapproving pundits and shouting, rock-throwing protesters. There’s been considerable noise coming out of Washington, D.C. since Trump’s inauguration. It’s often difficult to know what’s true and what isn’t, because politicians and pundits present points of view favorable to their preferences, often ignoring the needs of states and even those of the nation.

I’m still not a Donald Trump fan. I doubt I’ll vote for him in 2020, but he’s doing some things right and it’s been a long time since Alaska has seen that coming out of the Oval Office. Alaskans, lets focus on what’s actually being accomplished for Alaska and tune out the rest of the nonsense.

Posted September 12, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in politics

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Hey, Trump Voters! How Do You Like Betrayal?   1 comment

So, I think a lot of people have heard that President Trump and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) have agreed to pursue a deal that would permanently remove the requirement that Congress repeatedly raise the debt ceiling.

Trump signs Harvey aid, debt ceiling packageThis is a gentlemen’s agreement that’s been leaked by administration insiders. The Oval Office meeting included an agreement that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) would work with the two men over the next several months to finalize a plan. Congress would have to approve the plan, of course, but the leakers claim Senate Democrats believe they can finalize the arrangement by December.

One reason I didn’t vote for President Trump is one of the reasons I didn’t vote for Hillary Clinton. I suspected Trump is still a Democrat. You do know you can join any political party you want and nobody actually asks you to prove you agree with the platform? One day in every four years, I’m a Republican so I can vote in the GOP primary. I’m back to being a Non-Partisan (an actual “party” designation in Alaska) by the general. So, I’m not surprised that President Trump has made this decision to betray American conservatives who voted for him. I kind of thought he would do something like this because he’s a closet Democrat and Democrats really don’t see anything wrong with debt.

I’ve spent a lot of blog posts talking about the danger of debt. Just as runaway debt in your household will force you into bankruptcy eventually, runaway debt in the government will eventually drive Washington DC into bankruptcy. Just like some households carry some debt and they do okay so long as they keep it under control, the national government can also carry some debt, but we are currently carrying more debt than all debt for the entire history of the United States. We’re in trouble, folks, and that periodic discussion of the debt ceiling helps us to remember that and encourages Americans to demand Congress do something about it.

It’s a lot easier to increase spending levels if the people don’t know what the national debt is. That’s how the government got away with running up debts in the 1950s and 60s. But in the 1970s, we started a very steep recession and the debt became a subject of common discussion. It forced the eventual passage of the Contract with America, which almost retired the debt.

No, Clinton did not have an actual surplus of funds. He raided the Social Security Trust Fund to make it seem like he had. And, now, we are $20 trillion in debt and going up and they want to move the problem out of sight so that we won’t care so much about it.

 

 

So, my question is –

Are you pissed off yet, Republicans?

Are you going to do something real about it?

No, I’m not saying vote for the Democrats. They are behind this stupidity!

I’m becoming convinced that voting does nothing, but if you’re going to vote, at least don’t vote for Dweedle Dee (GOP) or Dweedle Dum (Democrats). Instead, pick a third party you mostly agree with and vote for them. Take away the power from the elites – Congress and President Trump. Maybe a Libertarian President with a mixed Repubican, Democratic and Libertarian Congress would be more likely to address the debt and insist we do something about it.

Or maybe it will teach all of us that voting doesn’t do ANYTHING and we need to do something far different.

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Wolfe's Rants

A writer's life - advice, works and musings by Wolfe Butler

Matthew Winters (Comeback Pastor)

The life, ministry, & thoughts of a Christ-follower, husband, dad, & minister

Thoughts of Dymphna

Reality is Subjective; enter mine.

Leo X. Robertson

News of my latest publications, events, and episodes of the Losing the Plot podcast!

Sherry Parnell

Author of "Let the Willows Weep"

Emerald Book Reviews

Book Reviews and Promotion Services

YA Chit Chat

The Ponderings of YA author J. Keller Ford

madchen863's Blog

Planet Earth: home of life

MIND MIX RADIO

Radio for the Awake and Aware

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