Archive for the ‘Third Party’ Tag

I’m Voting Third-Party   Leave a comment

Five/5/FIVE messages on my answering machine last night asking me to vote for _______________.

I”m a registered non-partisan super-voter, so my vote is especially coveted, courted, cajoled. Thanks, guys, I appreciate that I’m important to the electoral process.

Now GET THE *$%^&)@ off my answering machine!

I’m voting THIRD-PARTY and INDEPENDENT. The only political party race I”m casting a ballot in is Don Young and Forest Dunbar and that’s only because there is no third-party candidate and I can’t stand Forest Dunbar. Hear that, Forest! I think Don Young needs to retire, but I don’t think you should take his place, so I’m voting for him because you’re the only other person in the race.

I’m voting for the independent candidate for Governor — Bill Walker. I’m not actually voting for Byron Mallott (still the Democrat who got Lisa Murkowski back into the Senate after the Republican voters rejected her in 2010) and I hope Bill takes good care of himself.

I’m voting for the Libertarian candidate (Mark Fish) for Senator. Yes, Begich or Sullivan will win. I don’t care! I can’t vote for either of those two idiots.

I’m voting down the salmon initiative because I recognize that not everyone in Alaska is a commercial fisherman and most commercial fishermen plying Alaska waters are from Washington and Oregon. I am pro-Alaskan, not pro-fish cartel. I believe large scale mining and salmon fishing can and should coexist.

I’m not sure if I’m voting to legalize marijuana. I feel about marijuana the same way I feel about alcohol and other “recreational” drugs. They are dangerous and soul-sucking and society would be better off without them, but I don’t have the right to make that decision for the whole of society. Legalizing them won’t make them safe, but criminalization just creates criminals. My years in the mental health field means I know a great deal more about marijuana’s ugly side than the general public knows. Also, Alaska has had defacto decriminalization for more than 30 years,, so I’ve seen the societal affects first hand. Trying to portray it as harmless doesn’t mean that it is actually harmless. But, like alcohol, it’s not going to be stopped by criminalization. I might just leave that section of the ballot unchecked because I am ambivilant. Call it a clash between my Christian morality and good sense and my civil libertarian ideals. Yeah, I probably will just not check the box either way.

I’ve voting against the minimum wage hike because I believe forced higher wages reduces employment rates especially among the young and marginally skilled and ultimately provides employment opportunities for those who don’t pay taxes — mainly, illegal immigrants.

So, there you have it!

I’m voting, but not for any candidate who is getting big money or party endorsements. Stop calling me urging me to do so and STOP TELLING ME WHO TO VOTE FOR. I made that decision a long time ago without your help, which I never needed.

Do I Buy a Pig in a Poke?   Leave a comment

I was leery of the Conservative Party when it first got started in 2008. For one thing, it seemed a bit cheeky to call themselves the American Conservative Party. And, frankly, there was no time for them to build any sort of consensus by the November 2008 election. I gave them a cursory glance in 2012, but felt that the issues Obama presented were too important to allow him to win while I voted on principle. So, now, assured that there are three years to consider a new direction for the country, I am ready to say I like their platform.

As a Christian, I like their stand on religious freedom, which is that they don’t have much to say about it other than that it is a right and therefore protected. Remember what I said under the Constitution Party analysis … I’m an evangelical who is just fine with other religions worshipping freely in this country so long as their worship does no physical harm to anyone or damage property. I’m not threatened by what others believe — I know how it’s going to turn out in the end. A political party that takes a neutral position based on the Constitution aligns itself with my feelings on that subject.

I like that the ACP aren’t going for the presidency in 2016 and plan to focus on city councils and school boards in 2014 and maybe Congressional races in 2016. All politics is local and this sounds like a true grass-roots movement. When, if, they’ve a track record at the local and state levels in enough states, they can become a true national party. That is far more sensible than wasting time, energy and money getting certified for a presidential election at this point. Ballot access laws make that a dicey project at best.

On the other hand, the ACP seems a bit uncomfortable with allowing non-partisans like myself access to some of their state sites. They want money first. That could explain why my fellow Alaskans don’t appear to have formed a state site yet. Most of us are unwilling to buy a pig in a poke.

So, it looks like, at this moment, I am going to remain a non-partisan … for now.

Posted September 6, 2013 by aurorawatcherak in Third Party

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Constitution Party?   Leave a comment

We have a year to the midterms and three years to the Presidential election, so it seems like a really good idea to check our political compass and chart a new course now rather than later. I thought we might do that in the run-up to the 2008 election, but then conservatives (in the broad sense of the word) decided to cast their lot in with the GOP and the self-examination never happened.

There are alternatives to the GOP, folks! Why not look at them?

I confess, I like the sound of the Constitution Party. There’s resonance in that title. So, I checked them out. They’ve got some good ideas. Limited government, balanced budgets, states rights … all good ideas. I like that they say they are in favor of life and the freedom of religion. I like that the Alaska Independence Party endorsed some of their presidential candidates in the past.

As I read through their very long platform http://http://www.constitutionparty.com/, I started to get nervous. My civil libertarian side started to feel a bit concerned. All assurances aside, I felt like I was reading a manifesto on statism wrapped up in the words of liberty.

I’m a born-again Christian who absolutely believes in freedom of religion, but I also think everyone has the right to such freedom – including those who are wrong in what they believe – atheists, Muslims, cultists. As long as their belief does not result in physical harm to anyone else or their property, they have an absolute right to their belief and the Constitution Party left me feeling as if they didn’t agree with that. Like most evangelical Christians, I am not interested in establishing a theocracy and a party platform that makes me feel like an atheist who also happens to be a constitutional conservative would feel unwelcome in the Constitution Party makes me uncomfortable.
That wasn’t the only issue, but it was the one that had my stomach in the most knots. No party platform, being the product of humans, will be perfect, but my automatic reaction to any sort of totalitarianism is resistance.
If they clear that up, they might get my vote. If they don’t … doubtful.

Libertarian Party?   4 comments

The Libertarian Party isn’t really a conservative party. It’s a fiscally conservative party that advocates for leaving the other guy alone. On the surface, I like that idea, but I’ve got some reservations.

I agree that government exists to protect the rights of every individual and should not be engaged in choosing groups of individuals for special protection.

First, I have some good friends who were strong members of the Libertarian Party for over 20 years who withdrew several years ago because of the LP stance on the legalization of drugs and abortion. As a Christian who believes that murder is murder even if the victim is pre-born, I don’t think I can vote for people who say it doesn’t matter. I don’t find the constitutional argument for privacy holding any water in this instance. Our founders never would have agreed that murder was okay so long as it was private. The taking of human life is murder. Maybe I wouldn’t be comfortable with women and doctors who perform abortions being prosecuted as aggressively as people doing driveby shootings, but I still hold with the moral concept that abortion is murder and that the Constitution doesn’t give us a special right to commit murder under special circumstances. “All men are created equal” except if “they’re a black person living below a certain geographical line and then they’re not.” That was a special right granted white southerners by the Supreme Court and it was still wrong.

I agree that the military is way larger than it needs to be and that the United States should not attempt to act as global police officer, but when researching the LP, I also believe we must maintain our ability to wage war on foreign soil and not just react after the fact to aggression that comes against us. I believe that stance will leave us at the mercy of our enemies, fighting on Main Street USA instead of “over there”. We shouldn’t get involved in the wars of others and we shouldn’t pick fights just because we can, but why shouldn’t our enemies be the ones who suffer the consequences when they start wars with us rather than us having to rebuild?

I strongly disagree with allowing an open-borders immigration policy on the grounds that the United States has a right and obligation to its current citizens to protect them not only from military foreign invasion, but also from cultural foreign invasion. The United States of America will not remain the United States of America if we allow ourselves to be overrun by citizens of other countries who have no interest in assimilating to our culture. Even legal immigration needs to be measured to allow for assimilation of new immigrants without overwhelming the existing culture. Immigrants should add to our culture, not transform it.

So, while there are parts of the LP platform that I agree with, I cannot agree with enough of it to feel comfortable with it.

I think I’m beginning to understand why third-parties have such a hard time in national political races.

American Conservative Party   Leave a comment

I was leery of the Conservative Party when it first got started in 2008. For one thing, it seemed a bit cheeky to call themselves the American Conservative Party before conservatives had a chance to decide if they had earned that title. And, frankly, there was no time for them to build any sort of consensus by the November 2008 election. I gave them a cursory glance in 2012, but felt that the issues Obama presented were too important to allow him to win while I voted on principle. So, now, assured that there are three years to consider a new direction for the country, I am ready to say I like their platform.

As a Christian who also believes in civil liberties, I like their stand on religious freedom, which is that they don’t have much to say about it other than that it is a right and therefore protected. I like that they aren’t going for the presidency in 2016 and plan to focus on city councils and school boards in 2014 and maybe Congressional races in 2016. All politics is local and this sounds like a true grass-roots movement. When, if, they’ve established a track record at the local and state levels in enough states, they can become a true national party. That is far more sensible than wasting time, energy and money getting certified for a presidential election at this point.

On the other hand, the ACP seems a bit uncomfortable with allowing non-partisans like myself access to some of their state sites. They want money first. That could explain why my fellow Alaskans don’t appear to have formed a state site yet. Most of us are unwilling to buy a pig in a poke.

So, it looks like, at this moment, I am going to remain a non-partisan … for now. If they have a booth at the Alaska State Fair in Fairbanks, I’ll stop and talk with them. If not, well, they’re missing an opportunity here and not just with me, because as I said, most Alaskans are high-information voters.

Finding Our Voice   Leave a comment

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/january_2013/44_are_fiscally_conservative

Conservatives are the largest voting bloc in the United States. According to a January 2012 Gallup poll, 40% of Americans described their views as conservative, 35% as moderate, and 21% of liberal. Forty-four percent of likely voters said they were fiscally conservative in a January 2013 Rasmussen poll. So why aren’t we sweeping conservatives into office year after year, presidential election after presidential election? Politics … party politics – dictates that conservatives who vote with the Republican Party are forced to settle for moderate and progressive Republicans and endure the heartburn over broken promises after supporting an impostor.

Ted Cruz celebrates his victory in the Texas Senate race with his father, Rafael, and daughter Caroline on Nov. 6, 2012, in Houston.

It would be untrue for me to say there aren’t good, conservative Republicans holding office. There are some who serve diligently and deserve our profound thanks and support. However, despite their good intentions and hard work, they are powerless against parliamentarian tactics, establishment rule and cronyism. Conservatives have learned to accept that every Republican claims to be conservative during campaign season. The problem with our complacency is they eventually reveal their true colors as progressives and then real conservatives suffer and the conservative movement as a whole loses support. Party politics assures Republicans are voted into office instead of conservatives.

Starting in 2008, conservatives stayed home on Election Day, refusing to support a losing proposition. It was a smallish movement then that probably did not get Barack Obama into the White House, but in 2012 it decided the election of Barack Obama to a second term. Just enough conservatives hang in to keep the Republicans competitive, not knowing they could change the course of our country if we would act in unison.

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2012/11/08/the_case_of_the_missing_white_voters_116106-2.html

Without our support, the Republican Party would vanish overnight, and America would have a legitimate “conservative movement.” Unfortunately, too many conservatives believe that they have no voice without the Republican Party, so we compromise. Why put one’s self in such a dilemma and partake in such a soul-wrenching affair just to say later that the lesser of the two progressive Republicans is better than a progressive Democrat?

Why not pick up and move camp under a single, solitary conservative party?

I know … they never win … unless people vote for them as happened in 1860 and almost happened in 1992. Conservatives are 40-45% of the electorate. Bill Clinton won the 1992 election with only 38% of the vote. Third parties can make a difference and a true conservative party that spoke to the principles of our voting bloc could easily win a three-way election … which would send a strong message to the liberals and moderates that conservatives really do exist and we really do think our principles are what the country needs.

The real problem for me is … how do you pick one?

Alaska GOP – Fighting over the Compass   Leave a comment

I’ve said repeatedly that I am a nonpartisan, so you are unlikely to get a lot of party rhetoric from me. I don’t follow GOP insider news, but I heard this on the radio the other morning and researched it. It is indicative of why I am a nonpartisan and why I think conservatives are not very bright in continuing their attachment to the Republican Party. This scenario is being played out around the nation, wherever conservatives have tried to move the Republican Party back to the principles of the majority of GOP members. The battle is far from lost, but in Alaska, the “old guard” is winning because they have the resources.

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130409/alaska-gop-drama-results-chairwomans-ouster

The fact is that the GOP “old guard” has its own, more or less moderate progressive vision for the State of Alaska while conservatives have a fiscally responsible, smaller government vision for it. Who is in the majority? I don’t know. I’m not a GOP member, so don’t rub elbows with the precincts, but I would note that a “tea party” candidate whipped Lisa Murkowski’s hind end in the largest GOP primary turnout in state history (2010), which indicates an awful lot of people who vote in the GOP primaries favored the conservative candidate. Although the GOP leadership endorsed Joe Miller, their support was half-hearted at best and he lost in a squeaker of a write-in campaign. I can’t say for sure there were shenanigans going on, but it felt Chicago-like.

I know nothing about Debbie Brown other than she replaced Russ Millett who was never even seated. That’s the bigger story, because Russ Millett was elected by the party at the state convention, but the “old guard” refused to acknowledge him. You will also note in this story in the Alaska Dispatch how dismissive the reporter is toward Millett and supportive of the “leadership of the GOP.

How anyone with principles can think that the Alaska GOP represents the Alaskan people’s interests is beyond me!

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130403/castoff-millette-going-after-alaska-gop-over-misappropriation-funds

For a more balanced story, I’ve included a link to a small press that’s doing great Alaska coverage – the Alaska Native News – and the story on this that ran in the Anchorage Daily News.

http://alaska-native-news.com/political_news/7687-alaska-s-republican-party-ousts-incoming-chairman-russ-millette.html

http://www.adn.com/2013/01/31/2772735/republicans-to-resume-leadership.html

I’m hoping Alaskan conservatives – many of whom are like me and are registered non-partisan/undeclared – will read this and recognize that we need to make some major changes in this state because this is a clear example where the ruling class (establishment Republicans) are doing everything in their power to disenfranchise the country class (tea party, commonsense conservatives). These people are members of the same party. The ones shut out of the process were the duly elected representatives and the ones doing the shutting out insist that THEY know better than the people.  Think about it, Alaskans!

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