Archive for the ‘political philosophy’ Tag

Why I Like the Foreign Press   Leave a comment

Here is a perfect example of why I like the foreign press.

 

“If you kill Ted Cruz on the floor of the Senate, and the trial was in the Senate, nobody could convict you,” Republican senator Lindsey Graham said in remarks skewering his party’s presidential field at the Washington press club foundation dinner on Thursday night.

The Texas senator, a contender for the Republican presidential nomination, is extremely unpopular among his congressional colleagues.

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/feb/26/lindsey-graham-killing-ted-cruz-roasts-republican-candidates-rubio-trump

 

I didn’t even bother to analyze Linsey Graham in my rundown of Republican candidates because he actually ranks below Donald Trump in my mind. If I was going to vote for a Democrat, I would vote for Graham. He’s about as far from a conservative as Trump is — which is to say, progressive, liberal. That he endorsed dynasty (Bush for the uninformed) after he dropped out of the race just confirms to me that he is part of the Washington elite that really doesn’t get that the people are starting to wake up to the concept of “We the people” once more. We don’t want or need his tutulage.

Which is not to say that the entire country – right and left — has not become bat-shit crazy.

Really! Donald Trump is winning all the GOP primaries. What is up with that?

A friend suggests that Trump and Sanders are evidence that the United States has become France circa 1780s, a largely oppressed nation filled with entertained and unthoughtful people who whiff the concept of liberty and have no idea what it should look like or how they should conduct themselves in pursuit of it. The French revolutionaries followed some pretty bizarre people, promising some pretty bizarre things. It ended with a blood bath, followed by a dictatorship.

If he’s right, we’re in a lot of trouble, America. We have this great history, but our education system has so dumb-downed our kids (and our own generation, but we’ve had more time to read the classics on our own) that most of us have no idea of our responsibilities in a (classical) liberal society. We see that clearly in those who would vote Democrat. They buy the promises without ever talking about the current annual deficit that 100% of the rich’s income could not close and asking “where will you get the money.” Buy a clue — after the rich cannot close the gap, the government is coming for more of your pay check!

Democrats don’t seem to understand that (all they ever hear of the concept is when Tom Rogan can squeeze a word in edgewise on the MacLaughlin Group, but I’m not sure if Republicans get it either.

Ultimately, I’m a non-partisan conservative, so I’m speaking to conservatives right now.

  • If you really think that Trump is the answer to what is wrong with this country …
  • If you really believe he is different from Hillary …
  • If you think personality is more important than issues …

You are part of the problem. You’ve drank too much neo-conservative BS and you have completely lost any good sense you ever had. So wake up and smell the coffee! If Trump wins Super Tuesday, he’s the Republican nominee. I’m voting Libertarian, so I don’t care — except that it assures that either bat-shit-crazy and incompetent elitist Hillary Clinton or ivory-tower Bernie Sanders will be the next president of the United States.

Heck, what am I saying? It would be highly entertaining to watch Trump against Sanders and I place even money on who might win. Maybe we should just go for it and take the country over a cliff right now so then we can turn back to rebuilding it.

Of course, that leaves the question remaining — who will the first dictator be?

Issues Voting   Leave a comment

I don’t think progressives are evil. I believe they mean well, but I also think they are foolish, possibly misinformed, and apt to vote emotionally rather than rationally. I don’t think they fully think through the inevitable results of their policies and when those results become visible, they refuse to admit that they were wrong.

This is a fault of progressives in both parties. A corporate crony Republican is no more likely to admit that corporations are raping the country and overwhelming the rest of the economy than a liberal Democrat likely to admit that you can’t give everyone everything for free without driving the “rich” to leave the country, leaving the middle class to foot the bill, which will eventually lead to economic ruin.

Neither stance is healthy for a nation. To the extent that I still believe that the United States can be saved — if it is even worth being saved — I will vote in the 2016 Presidential elections. I don’t expect my vote to make a difference and, for the most part, I don’t care.

In the posts linked below, I’ve analyzed many of the candidates in the race and considered why I would vote for them or not.

Hillary Clinton is disqualified in my analysis because she wants to be queen. She thinks her relationship with former-President Bill Clinton entitles her to the Oval office now. What she is attempting to do is what our founders got rid of in the 1770s. We should learn from them. But then there’s her actions while as Secretary of State. Benghazi appears to have been a black flag operation that got away from the State Department. Of greater concern was her disregard for the email security measures that were standard at the State Department. Her private server was hacked. We ordinarily hold lesser members of the government responsible for that sort of breech of security. It shows us exactly what sort of monarch she would be. Ultimately, though, she could have great policies that I fully agree with and I would reject her because of the nepotism. We do not need dynastic rule in the US.

Jeb Bush is also disqualified in my analysis because he wants to be king. He thinks his relationship with former-Presidents Bush 1 & 2 entitles him to the Oval office now. What he is attempting to do is what our founders got rid of in the 1770s. We should learn from them. Moreover, though I didn’t deal with it, he’s a progressive business-class elite who is way too cozy with corporations. Ultimately, though, he could have great policies that I fully agree with and I would reject him because of the nepotism. We do not need dynastic rule in the US.

Bernie Sanders is a socialist who believes we can give everyone everything for free, soak the rich to pay for it, and life will be wonderful. That theory has been disproven by history on multiple occasions. He’s anti-corporations, which is commendable, but there are other candidates in the race who meet that standard and could pass a classical economics exam, which Sanders cannot. Just because he would allow people to vote to take away the civil rights and economic freedoms of the totality of society does not mean he isn’t a tyrant.

I then looked at the current field of the GOP. Trump is a misogynist egotist who thinks the Presidency is a popularity contest. I suspect he’s working for the Democrats. I did not seriously consider his policies because I cannot seriously consider the man. His support of single-payer health insurance puts him with Sanders in the loony-socialists-who-cannot-pass-an-economics-exam camp. He’s more of a fascist socialist, but they basically end up in the same place — a loss of freedom for the people in order to fulfill a government agenda.

I went through some of the GOP candidates and showed where I agreed with them and where I didn’t and why I might vote for them or might not. Some got higher marks than others, but ultimately, I rejected most of them on foreign policy aggression. I’m not dove. I believe in a strong defense and in a strong counter-strike capability, but I believe we should be pulling back our military empire to focus on protecting our own country. Yeah, that’s sort of isolationism … if one were to define isolationism by today’s insane standards. Ten years ago, I thought bases around the world were necessary for our defense. I have since thought on the subject and studied it and I have adjusted my thinking. We should have diplomatic relationships with all countries, be a porcupine defensively and not much more. We can’t afford it anymore and it ultimately makes Americans less safe worldwide and at home. I looked at Carly Fiorino, Marco Rubio, John Kasich, Ben Carson, and Ted Cruz — I found things to like about all of them and ultimately said I probably wouldn’t vote for any of them.

I’m voting for Rand Paul in the primary because I mostly agree with him on the issues. No, he’s not sexy or flashy, but he’s for liberty, entitlement reform, a reduction in taxes and a pulling back of some of our foreign empire. He probably won’t win the nomination, and I’m okay with that.

So, in November, that means I have a choice — vote for whomever the GOP nominee is, vote for whomever the Democratic nominee is, or vote for someone else. I’m not a Libertarian. I hold libertarian (small “l” deliberate) principles. But I will likely be voting for the Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson in November. I have issues with his platform, but I have issues with almost every candidate.

The very fact that a super-voter (I have voted in every election since I was 18 years old) is going to vote for someone most of the nation’s voters have never heard of should be a red flag for folks.

The ballot box has failed. I will continue to exercise the soap box and the jury box (as I have opportunity), but I suspect those will fail as well until after the progressives have tried to exercise the bullet box and forced a confrontation. Then I hope people will turn to my efforts on the soap box to find some guidance as to how to fix the mess they’ve made.

I Like Bernie Sanders   6 comments

No, seriously. I believe he’s sincere. I think he wants to make the United States a better place to live. Moreover, I admire the man’s willingness to stand up to Hillary Clinton. There’s evidence that some who have done that in the past have paid some pretty heavy costs for their bravado, so to get up there time and time again and call the shovel a spade is admirable.

He’s right. She cannot stand up to Wall Street because she is bought and paid for by Wall Street hedge fund managers. She also gets a lot of money from George Soros, several media outlets, labor unions and several health insurance and health care corporations.

I also admire his principle in sticking to small donations. It’s hard to be owned by any one (or a couple of dozen) donor when you take very small donations from a wide group of people.

I also agree with many of his criticisms of Republicans — the wars, the corporate welfare. I suspect, were I to sit down with him, we would find a lot of areas of agreement between us.

If Alaska’s Democratic primary were not a closed caucus, I might even vote for Bernie in the March caucus, not because I think he’d be a good president but because I’d like to see Queen Hillary’s head explode if she doesn’t get the nomination. Alas, you have to be a Democratic Party member to “vote” in the Democratic caucus in March and it is against my principles to join a political party, so I’ll have to leave it up to actual Democrats to coalesce around denying Queen Hillary her crown.

So, back to Bernie. I admire the man. I won’t be voting for him. It’s not personal. I’m a principles voter and admiring the man does not mean I agree with his principles. What he believes is good for the United States would be an economic disaster. No one who has taken an actual economics course believes you can give everyone everything for free and not raise taxes except on corporations and rich people. Tuition-free college, single-payer health insurance, expanded Social Security benefits, and all these other giveaways that he proposes all cost money, which must be paid for by taxing people.

Remember — I think taxation is thievery. It may be necessary thievery under the current system we live under, but it is still thievery. I want to reduce the thievery as much as possible by reducing the size and scope of government, which is the exact opposite of what Bernie is proposing.

I also recognize a reality that apparently has never occurred to Bernie. No poor person who ever given me or anyone I know a job. The more you tax “the rich” the more you reduce employment in this country, thereby creating more poor people. The fastest way out of poverty is to get a rich person to give you a real job doing something real, as opposed to having government create jobs that exist for the sole purpose of providing jobs, that must be funded by stealing tax dollars from productive members of society. That is an endless cycle of using other people’s money to prop up a system that is unsustainable. Sooner or later, you run out of other people’s money and you have to start taxing the very people you were trying to help in the first place. This has happened in every country that has tried socialism. We’ve seen the outcome in the Soviet Union and China. We see the increasing wobble in Europe. Do we really want to go there as a nation?

Then there’s his health coverage plan. Bernie proposes we all go under Medicaid. Have you ever had anything to do with Medicaid? No? Well, I have. I worked in social services for 15 years, so I am intimately familiar. It is an awful system that, by and large, does not allow for preventative care and delays treatment of conditions until they are fatal. It is characterized by many bureaucratic hoops between the doctor and the patient and by very long waiting lists. Only medications that are cheap and old are covered, so better medications are not available. In most states, Medicaid is the single largest expenditure in the state budget and it is a huge cost to the federal government. It also pays doctors at about 60% of the prevailing current rates, disincentivizing the creation of new doctors to replace the ones trapped in this new Sanders Medicaid system.

But, hey, it would make everyone equal … and, by and large, sick and untreated as well as unable to afford to purchase better health care even if it were available. It would also make us a nation enslaved to the tax man. England, Norway, many other single-payer health insurance countries tax pretty much everyone who is not on the government dole at better than 50% of their income to pay for their version of Medicaid. There are no entrepreneurs in Europe. Europeans of that mind set mostly immigrate to the United States because they can’t afford to be entrepreneurs in their home countries. Again, do we really want to go there as a nation?

Remember what I said about my principles remaining the same no matter who is espousing them? Well, admiring Bernie Sanders for being true to his convictions does not translate into thinking his convictions are a good idea. Enslaving your fellow Americans to pay for your health care … retirement … job … college … is a bad idea in every time and in every place. Doing it when you have no way to pay for it just doubles down on bad ideas. I believe he means well, but his goals are not going to work out to his pleasure.

So I won’t be voting for Bernie Sanders if he makes it to the general election. He seems like a nice guy, but I don’t think he understands how the real world works …

Which is mostly true of all socialists, by the way. Glorious pie-in-the-sky intentions backed by magical thinking that has never worked out anywhere in the past.

They’ll Be Watching You   15 comments

It happened almost without our realizing it. How did it start? Who authorized it? How do we get rid of it? Should we get rid of it?

I’m talking about the Surveillance State or, as I like to call it, institutional stalking. So are my fellow authors on the Open Book Blog Hop. Check out what Kelli Williams has to say on her blog and while you’re at it, maybe pick up a great book to read.

We’re interested in your opinion as well, so if you want to join us for the blog hop, click the links below.

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So, first, “nanny” spying. It wasn’t an option when my kids were little, so I had to rely on this quaint old-fashioned value called trust. Before I left my kids with someone, I got to know them a bit, so that I came to trust them with these precious humans. I turned down some people I knew pretty well because something in my gut said “No.” If I’d had a camera, maybe I wouldn’t have done that and I don’t think that would necessarily have been a good thing. I’m not sure our world is improved by the lack of trust and, generally, these nanny cams seem to mostly end the owners’ marriages, which makes me wonder who it is the installers are not trusting.

I used to work for a mental health agency that hired a paranoid supervisor who installed cameras in the residences to spy on the workers. They were absolutely no good for catching the client who murdered our coworker because they were all in the office focused on the workers. I was asked once to go through the tapes. What did I find?

Nothing! My coworkers were boring. They did their jobs. I learned that I am not a stalker at nature and that I have no desire to ever waste a day going through surveillance tapes again. Ever! I also solidified a vague feeling that I had that I don’t like this technology.

Ah, but these cameras and other surveillance catch criminals and terrorists! Do they?

Most Americans are deeply suspicious when government tells us that we should trust it with our privacy because “they” know what is best for us. That’s what the Obama administration tries to tell us as deep in the Utah desert, the National Security Agency (NSA) has built a $1.5 billion complex to collect and analyze data from the Internet. This complex quite literally could withstand a nuclear war, so our petty protests mean nothing to it.

Yeah, yeah, yeah — the Patriot Act is no more … but that didn’t stop the stalking. Stalkers don’t stop when you tell them to because they don’t care about you. And all of the changes in law will not affect their behavior.

To a certain extent, some of this is our own fault. We all give up a great deal of privacy whenever we choose to go out on the Net. Google keeps massive amounts of data on all of us and a good many of us have voluntarily allowed Facebook and other social media sites to pretty much track our every movement.

For the record, I might tell you I live in Fairbanks, Alaska, but I have my location blocked because it’s nobody’s business where I am at any given moment. Not Google’s … or Amazon’s … or the NSA’s. I may never fire a shot in a bloody revolution, but I will exercise my liberty to the fullest extent that I can within my capabilities of doing so. Every time Google or Facebook or whatever says “Let us know your location so we can serve you better”, I click the box that says “Block location”. I don’t have a GPS on my car or my cell phone. Nobody needs to know where I am!

Big Brother is watching you and just because it’s the government does not make it any less creepy than any other stalker. Just because Facebook asks permission does not mean you should comply. If a flesh-and-blood stalker asked you for permission to stalk you, would you say “since you asked, oh, sure”? I doubt it. So why do you allow these companies to do it?

Where I believe the surveillance state should exist is exactly where it hasn’t existed. Body cameras on cops and government officials would get my vote. They’re our employees and besides, if they want to watch everything we do, why shouldn’t we return the favor? It might curb their tendency to shoot unarmed civilians and generally tyrannize any citizen they come in contact with. Of course, some government officials may struggle with paying their bills when they can no longer take bribes. And, yes, I would stick body cameras on Senators and Presidents, make them wear them 24/7 and make the footage available to the public online. Fair is fair and they are ALL our government employees. If they want their privacy, they don’t have to take the job. I’m giving them far more choice in the matter than they have given us.

This philosophy undergirds much of my book Life As We Knew It and the series Transformation Project. The surveillance state is all over the book to where my main character even asks “Is there really anything resembling privacy anymore?” He is told that, no, there really isn’t.

And THEN terrorists blow up the world.

OP-DEC: Operation DeceitNo, I don’t believe the surveillance state keeps us safe. There are cameras everywhere in the United States and Europe and it didn’t stop the Boston Bombing or the Paris terrorist attacks. The invasion of privacy hasn’t stopped school shootings or mall mayhem. About all it does do is make it easier for law enforcement to issue speeding tickets. Maybe if the cameras were turned on the officials instead of the people, they would be effective. Otherwise … nope!

But wait! The day of drones is coming and that will just facilitate easier spying on we the people. So … what do we do about it?

No, that’s a question. What do you think we can do about it? Or do you think it’s a good idea to allow the government and Amazon to stalk our every move? Maybe you can convince me I’m wrong. Feel free to share. All opinions are welcome.

Bastiat on Plunder   Leave a comment

Frédéric Bastiat was a French journalist and economist who believed that all human beings possessed the God-given, natural rights of “individuality, liberty, property.”

“This is man,” he wrote. These “three gifts from God precede all human legislation.”

Writing in the late 1840s, Bastiat was alarmed by how France’s experiment in liberty had been “perverted” into an instrument of what he called legal plunder. Far from protecting individual rights, the law increasingly was used to deprive one group of citizens of those rights for the benefit of another group, and especially for the benefit of the state itself.

The man was a prophet!

He condemned the legal plunder of protectionist v tariffs, government subsidies of all kinds, progressive taxation, public schools, government “jobs” programs, minimum wage laws, welfare, usury laws, and more. Bastiat’s warnings of the dire effects of legal plunder are extremely relevant today. The system of legal plunder that we try to pass off as “democracy” today will erase from everyone’s conscience, he wrote, the distinction between justice and injustice. The plundered classes will eventually figure out how to enter the political game and plunder their fellow man. Legislation will never be guided by any principles of justice, but only by brute political force.

And there you have it — corporatism. https://mises.org/library/law

Bastiat was a great admirer of the United States. He died in 1850 … significantly before the run-up to the Civil War. I wonder what he would say if he could see the history of the US since then.

I suspect he would say that we set up the system we rail against today. We plundered the “wealthy” for decades after the institution of the income tax. While most people in the country paid no taxes, the “wealthy” paid rates of 50% or more. In the 1940s, the “rich” were paying 94% of their income to the federal government. In the 1970s they were paying 70% of their income.

Does that seem fair to you? It doesn’t seem fair to me.

If I can’t steal someone’s money legally on my own, why should government be able to steal it from them and give it to me? How does that make the plunder morally acceptable?

So maybe we shouldn’t be surprised that those who make good money see that the plunderers will be coming soon and they are trying to mitigate the damage by manipulating the system that would ordinarily plunder them so that they can keep more of their income. It’s not unlike building tall fences around our houses and putting bars on the windows. And when you think of it that way, you ought to be able to empathize with the wealthy just a little.

Consider this — if a person earns $250,000 is taxed at 94% of her income (which was the rate in 1946), that leaves this person with a functional income of $15,000 annually. Viewed that way, can you understand why they might resist? Do the math!

I’m still writing my next novel, so hopefully I’ll come back to this soon. It actually plays into some of the things I’m thinking about for the second book of Transformation Project. Yeah, I know, I’m working on Daermad Cycle right now, but I’m taking breaks by researching for the other.

And by the way, maybe 10,000 more words and I’ll be ready to start the rewrite. YAY!

 

TAMMY BRUCE: Confederate flag controversy is latest battle in left-wing war on Southern history – Washington Times   7 comments

While I am about as far from a Southerner as you can get and have zero attachment to the Confederate flag, this writer makes some good points.

TAMMY BRUCE: Confederate flag controversy is latest battle in left-wing war on Southern history – Washington Times.

I’m not so much fixed on the Confederate flag as on other history-rewriting efforts. Oklahoma just voted to remove the 10 Commandments from its capitol grounds. I’m waiting for the sand-blasting of Biblical references from the US Capitol.

Once this starts it’s hard to stop and pretty soon, you’re living in Soviet Russia where history changed with the whim of the current ruler.

One of the things I love about the US Constitution is that it shows the amendments. The amendment authoring Prohibition was repealed, but it remains in the Constitution, along with the amendment repealing it, so that we can see our history. We used to understand that learning from our history or the histories of other nations, was vital.

I’m afraid we’re losing that.

Independence Day?   1 comment

So today is the day we set aside on our calendar to remember when our ancestors declared our country’s political independence from England. We holds parades, sand-castle building contests, fire works displays, concerts in the parks, and barbecues … lots and lots of barbecues.

But do we ever stop to think about what independence meant and whether we as a nation still exemplify that understanding?

Not really.

That’s obviously in the crap we take from our government. We all say we love freedom, but what freedom do we still have? I’m paying for health insurance regardless of whether in need it or not and paying extra so that people who have a lot of health conditions can pay less. Is that freedom? It doesn’t look like it to me. I’d rather spend that money on other things. If I could pay for catastrophic coverage (like I used to), I’d have a savings account again that I could use for medical expenses as needed or for buying a newer car before the one I have breaks down permanently. If that happens, I will have to incur several hundred dollars a month in payments because I haven’t got a savings account to use to buy a car with cash.

So, I lack basic freedom because in a town where you need to have a car to get around, I can’t afford to buy an affordable car because I’m forced to buy medical insurance I don’t need.

I have ZERO attachment to the Confederate flag. I grew up about as far from the south as you can grow and my great-grandfather was an abolitionist. Like many people I see it as a symbol of racism, but I’m willing to believe southerners I know (yes, Alaska has a lot of ex-pat southerners) who say they see it as a symbol of unbowed enthusiasm for states rights in the face of overwhelming tyranny. I know the acquaintance now driving around town with two of them streaming off the back of his truck is not a racist, so I’m assuming he’s doing it for another reason. Nostalgia, freedom of speech, a statement about states rights, a statement about liberty in general ….

But when I watched him drive by, two women behind me were talking in loud voices about how he ought to be arrested for his “racist” actions, as if they have forgotten that liberty means we all have a right to express opinions.

I stand with Fred Phelps in his refusal to be forced to participate in the pagan mating rituals of same-sex couples by sanctifying them through baking wedding cakes for them. We seem to have forgotten in this country that freedom of religion includes not forcing our neighbors to worship our god against their will. By forcing business owners like Mr. Phelps into catering to same-sex weddings, you are demanding that they kneel at a pagan altar. You may not see it that way, but that is the Biblical understanding of it. You are violating freedom of religion by insisting upon it.

I have very little use for the federal government. I can’t think of many things in this world that the federal government does that benefits me directly. Maybe the money it gives the State of Alaska for roads … but trust me, if the federal government quit doing that, the State of Alaska and the people who live here would figure out how to pay for them ourselves and we’d probably start building roads to the Scandanavian standards so they don’t fall apart every five years, which would reduce road costs in the long-run.

Right now, 25% of my income goes to the federal government for …???? That’s about 23% less liberty than our Founders had because they paid only excise taxes on the goods they purchased.

Like it or not, sooner or later, we will all of us have to pay a whole lot more in taxes because the federal government continues to spend like a drunken sailor. We’re $18 trillion in debt. We owe only a fraction of that to foreign entities, but if they ask for it back …. If we default on the debt owed to Americans, we bankrupt everybody’s retirement accounts. Yeah, so we lose freedom at one end by higher taxes to service the debt I didn’t ask the federal government to run up and then we lose freedom at the other end when they gut our retirement accounts. In the middle there is the increasing real inflation of food and fuel that is largely driven by our debt and the effects of quantitative easing (also known as printing fiat currency).

The freedom to spend the money you earn on what you want to spend it was well understood in the Founding generation. So how much liberty does the tax man take from you? Between the IRS, Social Security and medical insurance, I’m somewhere in the 40%, but people who make more money than me are up in the 60%.

So are we the land of the free anymore?

Perhaps we ought to look at the Declaration of Independence and ask ourselves:

Could we sign it today?

But of course, that’s the dirty little unspoken among us, right? We who celebrate that our ancestors seized their independence from the English know that the US government does not recognize our right to do the same from them.

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