Archive for the ‘Obama’ Tag

Racism is a Two-Way Street   Leave a comment

As the title suggests, this article is not really about the US attack on Iran. Issues rarely exist in isolation and sometimes when we talk about one issue, we find other issues that need to be addressed.

President Trump just (probably) started an unnecessary war with Iran that will only make the situation in the Middle East worse. I’ve criticized him for it. It’s not a winnable war and it just creates bogeymen for the Iranian regime to use as a recruitment tool.

President Barack Obama

In discussing this, though, I’ve been clear that we’re not helped by criticizing President Trump while excusing the very similar actions of prior presidents. As the most-recent former occupant of the Oval Office, President Obama’s actions are open to criticism. Trump, acting under the War Powers Resolution, didn’t seek congressional approval because he doesn’t need to for 60 days. I disagree with any president using that power absent a direct assault on the American mainland, but that’s what exists currently.

Obama wanted to go to war in Syria and asked Congress to approve a 60-day foray into a country that had no history of attacking US forces. Congress declined to authorize the war and Obama then proceeded to arm the Al Qaeda factions that became ISIS and dropped thousands of drone missiles on Syrian targets. The US Congress didn’t declare war, but I’m pretty sure the Syrian people felt they had. There’s nothing like a drone missile coming through the roof of your house and killing you as a declaration of war. That overrules a vote of Congress every time.

But, as I alluded earlier, the situation in the Middle East is not really the subject of this article.

President Donald Trump

My even-handed criticism of the similar actions of two presidents prompted an accusation of racism. I couldn’t possibly think President Obama was a genocidal monster for dropping thousands of drone missiles on civilian targets unless “there’s some racial element” in my thinking. I would have loved his economic policies if his skin were white. Yeah, I would have been fine with that $6000 annual increase in health insurance premiums if it had been caused by a white president’s policies.

It is impossible, especially on the internet, to counter allegations of racism. My private life speaks for itself. I live in a very diverse state, have friends of all races, and nobody I know personally thinks I’m a racist. But these days, on the internet, you’re guilty until proven innocent and there’s no exculpatory evidence you can present that will convince the ideologically-possessed of who you are in real life. We’ve all become monkeys throwing poo at the bars of our cages and don’t engage in reasoning if you don’t want to risk getting some on you.

I’m withholding flinging poo and continuing to reason instead.

Racism is more varied than we realize

Racism is treating another person differently because of the color of their skin. Racism doesn’t look at anything as more important than skin color in determining the character of the person being evaluated.

Racism is not specific to race. White people can be racist toward people of color. Black people can be racist toward anyone who isn’t black. As an American Indian, I have heard many of my cousins make clearly racist statements about both whites and blacks. Increasingly in our modern times, some white people actually sound racist toward whites. It’s the whole “privilege” argument — that just because your skin is pale brown, you somehow have a better life and the societal skids are greased for you toward success, ignoring the very real barriers to success created by affirmative action that provide legs-up for minorities.

Anytime you treat another person differently because of the color of their skin you are showing racism.

Why can’t we criticize Obama’s warmongering?

Why do some people who loudly object to Donald Trump’s largely unprovoked aggression in the Middle East refuse to criticize Barack Obama’s very real history of unprovoked aggression in the Middle East?

The US has no vital interests in the Middle East. We should continue to peaceful trade with Middle Eastern countries but stop our military and covert interference there. But in order to do that successfully, we need to acknowledge that our warlike behavior has been promoted by successive presidencies. It’s not a Republican problem or a Democratic problem. Both major political parties are warmongers. We need to be able to criticize all of those who promote unnecessary wars equally based on what they did or are doing. To be critical of presidents with white skin while giving Barack Obama a pass because his skin color is dark brown — that’s racism.

Posted January 4, 2020 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

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Obama Spying on Trump?   1 comment

Image result for image of edward snowdenUm, of course Trump Tower was wiretapped by the Obama administration. Thanks to Edward Snowden, we all know that we’ve all been wiretapped. Big Brother is watching us. Obama is responsible for that because he knew the program existed and, “constitutional scholar” that he isn’t, he did nothing to protect the people from this intrusive program that spies on all of us. Was candidate Trump specifically targeted? Well, he was Hillary Clinton’s opponent and Obama definitely wanted Clinton to win, so …. Once you start something like this, it becomes very easy to justify its extension in support of your own goals. Power corrupts. Absolutely power corrupts absolutely. Presidential power is absolute power.

When is President Trump going to announce the end of spying on Americans?

Obama Turns his Back on Cuban Asylum Seekers | David J. Bier   Leave a comment

President Obama is abandoning America’s five decade-old policy on asylum seekers that guarantees Cubans asylum in the United States. The change comes at a time when more Cubans will have arrived at U.S. borders than at any time since 1980, and it is a major win for the Cuban regime and opponents of immigration, both of which oppose Cuban immigration to the United States. But the sudden reversal is bad policy that will harm efforts to secure the border and aid the regime most hostile to human rights in the Western Hemisphere.

America—and specifically Miami—has benefited enormously both economically and culturally from the presence of Cuban immigrants.

In 1966, Congress passed the Cuban Adjustment Act (CAA), which grants lawful permanent residency to any Cuban national who has resided in the United States for at least two years (later lowered to one). Each of the last eight administrations has interpreted the law to allow almost all Cubans who arrive at U.S. borders to apply for “parole”—a discretionary legal status that permits them to enter and wait a year to receive a green card to stay permanently.

This system has served the United States extraordinarily well. Because Cubans who enter illegally cannot apply for a green card, border security is enhanced as they never try to sneak past Border Patrol. Instead, they just line up and turn themselves in at a port of entry. They show their Cuban passports, receive background checks, and then are admitted. The United States has very few unauthorized immigrants from Cuba precisely because all Cuban immigrants who make it into the country are paroled and adjusted to legal permanent residency.

Cuban Immigrants are a Success Story

America—and specifically Miami—has benefited enormously both economically and culturally from the presence of Cuban immigrants. After the Mariel boatlift that initially brought about 125,000 refugees to Florida, Miami’s population has grown much faster than other cities. Despite often arriving destitute, U.S. Cubans today have achieved the same median income as all Hispanics and actually have the highest rate of home ownership. The Kauffman foundation ranked Miami in the top two cities in the entire country for entrepreneurship in 2016, driven in part by its large immigrant population. Miami also has the best ranking in the state for upward mobility.

Most importantly, U.S. immigration policy has allowed 10 percent of all Cubans to escape the most tyrannical regime in the hemisphere. This policy is a direct assault on a regime that preys on its own people, and for this reason, the regime has repeatedlycondemned it. President Obama said that the United States will now treat “Cuban migrants the same way we treat migrants from other countries.” But Cuba is not like all other countries. It is the only dictatorship on America’s side of the world. As I wrote in the Miami Herald last year:

The basic principle that people should not be treated differently based on national origin is valid, but Cubans receive special treatment not due to where they are from, but due to how they are treated where they are from. Cubans aren’t treated uniquely because they are Cubans, but because, according to Freedom House, Cuba is the only “unfree” country in the Western Hemisphere.

The communist system has no electoral process, political dissent is a criminal offense, corruption is rampant, independent media is banned, and all forms of everyday activities are regulated, including internal movement. Cuba is the 12th most unfree country in the world. It is less free than Iran and South Sudan. Even communist China received a higher score. No other country in the Americas comes close. In 2015, the pretend socialists in Venezuela were still 50th and ranked “partly free.” Haiti and Honduras came in at 57th and 62nd respectively. This is why Cubans are singled out.

Congress stated in 1996 that the law would end when “a democratically elected government in Cuba is in power.” As long as Cuba remains unfree, America will continue to welcome Cubans. Rather than repeal this principle, Congress should expand it to any country in our part of the world that is unfree.

The fact remains, however, that President Obama cannot end the Cuban Adjustment Act (CAA) itself, which guarantees permanent residency after one year to any Cuban who legally entered the United States. Because the normal asylum system is so backlogged, this change could result in Cubans filing asylum claims under the normal system, as Central Americans do, and waiting in line for a year before applying for a green card under the CAA as they always have. Ultimately, this could dilute the impact of the policy shift.

Nearly 10,000 people were arbitrarily arrested in Cuba in 2016 alone.

Nonetheless, the current asylum system, which is already massively backlogged, will only grow more so as a result. At a time when a record number of asylum seekers from Central America are coming to the border, the United States is going to throw the Cuban refugees in with the rest, making a dysfunctional system that much more broken. It will also increase illegal immigration as Cubans will know that they can no longer be guaranteed admission, and those who believe that they will have their asylum claims quickly dismissed will seek illicit means of entry.

Some people claim that the only reason that so many immigrants are coming right now is that they fear that the administration would do exactly what it has just done by changing the law. But the fact is that the rise in Cuban arrivals in recent years started before President Obama announced any changes in Cuban policy. Its true causes are 1) the Cuban regime’s relentless assault on human rights, and 2) its decision to end restrictions on travelling abroad, which has led many oppressed Cubans to seize the chance to leave.

Despite President Obama’s hopeful message after the death of Fidel Castro, the Cuban government continues its oppressive policies. Nearly 10,000 people were arbitrarily arrested in 2016 alone, and there was a particularly large surge of arrests after Castro’s death, demonstrating that his death means little.

Donald Trump, whose statement condemning the Cuban dictator after his death had more moral clarity than any single statement that the president-elect has ever made, should immediately reverse this policy upon assuming office. The United States should honor its commitment to remain open for as long as the electoral process in Cuba remains closed to the Cuban people.

Republished from the Cato Institute.

Source: Obama Turns his Back on Cuban Asylum Seekers | David J. Bier

Posted January 19, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in Foreign policy

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Obama’s Real Legacy   Leave a comment

My brother is a liberal who loves Obama and is thrilled with his legacy (shutting down Alaska drilling notwithstanding, which Jeff realizes will kill Alaska’s economy). I got to listen to him extol Obama’s legacy over Christmas dessert. Fortunately, Jeff allows people to counter his arguments (he was raised by our mother, after all).

Image result for image of the syrian civil warObama is feverishly trying to set his legacy in concrete. It’s the usual Democrat “lame duck” stupidity. While I agree with pardoning convicted felons, locking up Alaska’s offshore oil depositions is just plain national suicide, and stashing billions of taxpayer dollars in federal agencies that will then act as governments unto themselves, taking away freedoms one regulation as a time is equally stupid.

Hoo-haw! He’s running roughshod over the actual rights of some people in order to give the ill-informed what they think they need. Isn’t democracy great? The problem with this scenario is that no Obama lover seems to recognize that Obama’s primary legacy is not so warm and fuzzy and the damage it causes may go on for decades after Obama has passed from the public mindset.

The forgotten Obama legacy is ISIS, the Syrian civil war, and the resulting mass migration/invasion of Europe. Bluntly stated, the whole idea to bring “democracy” to Syria was hatched by the Obama Administration and probably mostly by the Emperor himself, which some enthusiastic encouragement from Hillary. The conversation probably went something like this:

Mr. President, if you topple this dictator and install an American-friendly puppet government in his place, people will remember you as a great foreign policy president and forget all about you literally bowing to dictators early in your presidency. Assad is ripe for the picking. His people hate him and you can make up any story you want … you know the Americans who love you will believe whatever you say. And those others … they’re pro-war anyway, so their protests will sound silly and racist.

When Assad refused to concede to Obama’s “superiority” and refused to step down as Obama demanded, Obama’s ego wouldn’t let it rest. It became an ego contest between Obama, Assad and Putin not because Assad and Putin were seeking to get into a pissing context with the Commander and Chief of the largest military in the world, but because Obama’s ego is so big that his pride couldn’t take it that Assad didn’t just do what he demanded.

Image result for image of the syrian civil warLiberals say “words matter” and that’s why they don’t call terrorism “terrorism”, but when all you do is tell lies, words actually don’t matter when they originate from your mouths. Liberals say calling terrorism “terrorism” gives the terrorist power. That’s ridiculous! Words do not give terrorists power. The weapons Obama gave them gives them power.

Bear with me a moment. The US has a long history of covertly arming “rebels” around the world. The Reagan administration sold weapons to Iran less than a decade after Iranians captured the US embassy and held US diplomatic staff as prisoners. They then used the proceeds of that sale to arm “rebels” in El Salvador. We know this because the US press reported on it throughout the end of the Reagan administration.

We did the same thing in Afghanistan in the 1980s and created al-Qaida in the process.

The media doesn’t mention all the blood Obama has on his hands. ISIS started as a small off-shoot of Al-Qaida that wanted to use more brutal tactics than its parent organization. ISIS could not have won the battlefield victories they have without major military weaponry from somewhere. Neither could the so-called “moderate” rebels, who are out-and-out terrorists the Obama administration  relabeled as “moderates” to justify funneling weapons to them. Terrorists blow crap up to inflict terror on a population. The “moderate” rebels blow crap up, thus inflicting terror on the Syrian people, causing them to flee their country.

When the war-weary American people demanded the US government opt out of involvement in the Syrian civil war, Obama found an al-Qaida-affiliated group to add to the chaos. Given the Kalashnikovs and other Russian-made arms found in ISIS hands, it’s likely the US is using our brand new NATO allies in Eastern Europe to arm them. Yes, Eastern Europe would rather have Putin distracted in the Middle East than breathing down their necks in Europe the way he is in Ukraine. We certainly know that American-made pickup trucks sold in the United States as used vehicles showed up in ISIS hands. This is how ISIS got the anti-tank missiles to take out Assad’s armor and anti-aircraft missiles capable of downing Assad’s aircraft. There’s obviously been continual re-supply of replacement small arms, ammunition, light artillery, food, clothing, medical supplies, and vehicles. These items weren’t picked up at garage sale. They were bought in Eastern Europe with American money, just as we armed the Iraqi puppet army after 2003. The United States thought these groups would topple Assad and then invite the US government to install an American-friendly regime through a rigged election where both candidates were groomed by US convert agencies years ago. Remember the Orlando shooter’s father?

Image result for image of the syrian civil warThe problem with this plan was that the Syrian voters fled Syria, taking their votes with them. These people are now all homeless. Europe, who ought to be really pissed off at the result of Obama’s pride, absorbed tens of thousands of refugees and more keep coming. The Obama administration has yet to admit they failed and give up this tragic course of action. They continued arming and training “rebels” over there and that kept the war going. Rather than cooperate with the nations fighting ISIS, they were training “rebels” to fight Assad, Iran, Russia, and ISIS.

You’d think Europe would wake up and smell the coffee and recognize that Obama administration is the responsible body for all of the bloodshed and refugees. I keep hearing hints of this realization on PBS, but they don’t want to come out directly and say Obama is directly responsible for the Syrian civil war dragging on for years and that only U.S.-supplied weapons made that possible.

Judging from al-Qaida (which ISIS is an off-shoot of), we can look forward to at least another two decades of attacks from ISIS. Al-Qaida began during the Afghan-Soviet War (another terrorist group we created to fight a government, too) and started operations against the West in 1993. They hit the World Trade Center with a truck bomb during Clinton administration. Europe better get used to terrorism attacks because they will continue for decades to come. The United States ought to realize we’ll soon see major attacks that will dwarf the last two mass shooting. We just haven’t seen ISIS’s version of 9-11 yet. When that comes, some of us will recognize that as President Obama’s true legacy, but I suspect that Obama lovers like my brother will blame the last or current Republican administration rather than their “hero”.

Posted December 29, 2016 by aurorawatcherak in Non-partisan

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President Obama: “We Don’t Look to Be Ruled” | Jeffrey Tucker   Leave a comment

Jeffrey Tucker’s analysis of Obama’s speech is spot on, except he only lightly touches on how Obama has been the most dictatorial president we’ve had in our lifetimes. He started his presidency with a statement that can be summed up with “Sit down, shut up, elections have consequences.” He has ruled us as he sought to do … as Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton both seek to do. Lela

 

It’s not the promises of an iron fist that speak to us, but rather the opportunities provided by freedom.

Source: President Obama: “We Don’t Look to Be Ruled” | Jeffrey Tucker

 

Here’s what fascinates me about political rhetoric: when a politician really seeks to be as compelling as possible — to entice people into moral sympathy with a vision, to elicit trust from the voters, to touch the very core of our aspirations for life and politics — the language of liberty serves the cause best.

Freedom is what inspires and ennobles us.It’s not the promises of an iron fist that speak to us, but rather the opportunities provided by freedom. It is not the power of politics they emphasize but the power of people on their own.

We’ve seen it often over the decades but rarely more poignantly than in President Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention. Here we have a president who has spent eight years constructing an apparatus of executive rule, pushing out the boundaries of government imposition as far as possible, in every area of life, most conspicuously in education, surveillance, foreign policy, gun rights, and health care.

And yet, when it comes time to make a case for his party as against the Republican Party, and to make the case for his chosen successor, he gives us these awesome and inspiring words:

We are not a fragile or frightful people. Our power doesn’t come from some self-declared savior promising that he alone can restore order. We don’t look to be ruled. Our power comes from those immortal declarations first put to paper right here in Philadelphia all those years ago; We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that together, We, the People, can form a more perfect union.

That’s our birthright — the capacity to shape our own destiny.That’s who we are. That’s our birthright — the capacity to shape our own destiny…. America has never been about what one person says he’ll do for us. It’s always been about what can be achieved by us, together, through the hard, slow, sometimes frustrating, but ultimately enduring work of self-government….

My grandparents explained that they didn’t like show-offs. They didn’t admire braggarts or bullies. They didn’t respect mean-spiritedness, or folks who were always looking for shortcuts in life. Instead, they valued traits like honesty and hard work. Kindness and courtesy. Humility; responsibility; helping each other out….

Demagogues will always fail in the end.That’s why anyone who threatens our values, whether fascists or communists or jihadists or homegrown demagogues, will always fail in the end.

That’s America. Those bonds of affection; that common creed. We don’t fear the future; we shape it, embrace it, as one people, stronger together than we are on our own.

Exactly: we don’t look to be ruled. Our value as a people comes not from the top down but from within — from character, resilience, decency, all of which emanate from freedom itself.

Now, you can read that as an attack on Donald Trump, which it surely is. But what is the best way to achieve that? Where is Trump most vulnerable? President Obama found it: Trump aspires to be a strongman, and America is not about that. It’s a very effective critique, even if it emanates from the wrong source. For the Democrats to make such a critique is hypocrisy of the highest order.

Are we really supposed to pretend that the top-down imposition of Obamacare never happened? That Common Core didn’t come to dominate American education? That Obama played no role in the vast expansion of digital surveillance? That Obama’s (and Clinton’s) foreign policy did not extend the mindless war-making of his predecessors and did not unleash unholy hell all over the Middle East and Europe, setting off a catastrophic refugee crisis and spreading the terror threat throughout the world?

We look to be free of rule.Yes, we are supposed to forget all that. And if we set that aside, there is a wonderful lesson to be learned in the newest iteration of Obama: we don’t look to be ruled. We look to be free of rule.

It has also been generally true that presidents give their best – and most liberty-minded – speeches in the twilight days of their power. Think of George Washington’s Farewell Address and his remark that “the great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible.” Consider Eisenhower’s final warning that “we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex.” Or Reagan’s final speech, reiterating the vision of America as a “Shining City on a Hill,” and proclaiming: “Countries across the globe are turning to free markets and free speech and turning away from the ideologies of the past.”

Eventually, they see through the myth of power.We might ask ourselves: why do powerful people turn to liberty-oriented themes in the last days of their power? Perhaps it is because, in the course of their rule, each of these people gradually discover that ruling is not all it is cracked up to be.

They arrive in their offices with grand ambitions, the perception of a public mandate, and huge plan for making the world conform. What they face is a vast and implacable bureaucracy, a legacy of centuries of lawmaking, a professional class of managers and fixers at all levels of government, an army of special interests and lobbyists who are ready for war to the knife over the slightest changes in the operations of government, and a populace who just never seem to get with the program.

And there are only so many hours in a day. What presidents must probably discover is not how much power they have, but rather the opposite: how much power the apparatus of government has over them. Between all the meetings with dignitaries, the travels, the speeches and public appearances, the flattering of big shots that swirl in and around the White House at all hours, they are wholly dependent on their advisers, who are in turn dependent on theirs, who are in turn dependent on theirs.

When presidents finally get a chance to act, they make a hash of it.And yet there are moments when presidents do seem to act with genuine authority extending from their own volition. Bush invaded Iraq, and look what that did to the world. Obama threw himself behind Obamacare, with the conviction that a vast array of experts had vetted the system and pronounced it good. The whole thing blew up and wrecked much of what was good in American healthcare. The legacy of his signature legislation is so unpopular that mention of it was reduced to just one oblique reference in his convention speech.

So, yes, the experience of governing can be truly humbling. I can’t imagine the trauma that this is going to cause Trump, whose only experience has been in bossing people around in the private sector in businesses he owns. No one in particular owns government, and the bureaucracy is never more implacable than when faced with someone who purports to be in charge of them.

If presidents were to be honest with themselves, they would have to admit that they were fools to believe that the government, much less the whole nation, could be ruled by their will alone. It’s preposterous to believe that 300 million people — each person with a mind, heart, will, soul all his or her own — can be ruled by anyone.

Someday I hope to read an honest autobiography of a former president:

I arrived flush with anticipation of changing the world. Crowds screamed my name and cried out for me to bring justice, fairness, equality, and happiness to the country. I discovered over time that I personally had very little power at all, and the little I did have was dangerous because the results were nothing like what I had anticipated. I pretended to be important. I kept up appearances. People doted on me constantly.

And yet I learned, gradually, that I was just one man, and the system swallowed me completely. And that’s probably a good thing too because, in the end, I’m no different from anyone else, no more or less capable, no more or less knowing and brilliant. My main talent was in campaigning and here I excelled. As for governing, I wouldn’t wish it on anyone.

Or as Obama beautifully summed it up: “We don’t look to be ruled.”

Posted July 29, 2016 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

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Hated by Merkel, Soros, and Obama   2 comments

Brad and I have been wondering about Hungary because BBC News and DW keep mentioning them, so I finally went in search of something about them. Generally whenever state-owned media call another country “fascist”, I’m skeptical and I found out why. I don’t know enough to say that I believe this article 100%, but my daughter and I both experienced Germany’s idea of “freedom” and came away from the experience appreciating America more, though also more sensitive to the tyranny that seems to be growing here as well.

Source: Hated by Merkel, Soros, and Obama

Obama Proposes $60 Million Tax on Middle Class Families   3 comments

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2016/02/04/president-obama-oil-tax-gasoline/79835274/

AFP 547606058 A FIN USA VAIn the glowing language about helping to slow climate change in a time of low crude oil prices, it’s easy to miss the bottom line. At current prices, Obama’s $10 a barrel oil tariff would work out to around $60 million in costs to consumers as they fuel their cars and heat their homes.

Analysts say this would fall most heavily on the middle class who are the ones who use their cars to get to work and who own homes that require heating.

I’m sure that’s not going to have any sort of negative effects on the economy and if it does, well people ought to accept it as their effort toward controlling the weather. Stealing money from actual working people to give to “clean technologies” won’t cause any problems at all … so long as you are either rich (and therefore insulated from the true costs of this lunacy) or eligible for government assistance (and therefore insulated from the true costs of this lunacy). And then, when more people are required to take benefits in order to heat their homes and take public transportation, those middle class families will be hit with additional taxes to pay for that increase … until they themselves become eligible for benefits.

Eventually, you run out of “other people’s money” and the whole system collapses, right along with everything the middle class was working for … like homes and sending their kids to college and having food to eat.

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