Archive for the ‘#IndieBookBoost’ Tag

Woo-Hoo!   Leave a comment

Two Cover MontageThe Willow Branch and Mirklin Wood both broke 10,000 today as free books (Happy, Summer Solstice!)

I also lowered Life As We Knew It and Objects in View to 99 cents each for the Solstice. This deal might hold through the weekend … unless I change my mind … but it will definitely be on until Friday.

Get all four books at GREAT prices.

Free for the Launch   Leave a comment

Hullabaloo Front CoverHullabaloo on Main Street debuted today and it will be free for the next two days. Go out and grab a copy and then leave a review.

Come take a tour of America’s “bubble battles” in the wake of the 2016 Presidential election. Libertarian Connor wryly observes his neighbors on both sides of the political divide and offers a solution we can only hope the bubble dwellers will consider.

This novelette is a work of fiction and any resemblance to yourself or people you know is purely coincidental.

What They’re Saying About “Transformation Project”   Leave a comment

“I had never read any of Markham’s books until last night, and I read two of them in one sitting.” Texanna – Amazon Reviews  https://www.amazon.com/Lela-Markham/e/B00OQWYP68/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1489991978&sr=1-1 #apocalyptic #kindle #indiebookboost

Two Cover Montage

Interview with Aaron Brinker   1 comment

 

 

Today’s interview is with Aaron Brinker. Welcome to the blog. Tell us something about yourself. 

Aaron BrinkerMy wife and I make our home in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. She works at a non-profit (Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge) and I am currently unemployed and looking.

 

At what point did you know you wanted to be a writer?

 

I wrote my first story in the 7th or 8th grade, and actually have it in my backlist of projects to publish. It needs a lot of work, but has a lot of potential. I had a downward spiral into depression a few years ago. During that plummet, I wrote a few poems and showed them to one of my college professors. He sat down with me and told me what he thought. He asked me what I was majoring in and told me whatever path I chose I needed to write.

 

Tell us about your writing process.

I have found that outlining works best. I still lend enough to variation and creation. I will outline a novel scene by scene and basically write a few words of what the scene is about. i.e. character x and character y have a discussion at such location. Personally, this makes it easier for me in the sense that I don’t focus on a word count but a scene or two a day.

 

What is your favorite genre … to read … to write?

The Narrative of Benjamin WhiteReading and writing I prefer a variety of genres. Mythical, fantasy, horror, biographies are all genres I love. I was a big fan of the Narnia series growing up. Ted Dekker is one of my favorite authors. When it comes to writing, I love writing paranormal, horror, historical fiction, Christian fiction and fantasy. I am planning hopefully later this year to start penning my autobiography.

 

What are you passionate about?

I’m passionate about writing, helping out where I can with my wife’s employer, fishing, gaming, and reading.

 

When you are not writing, what do you do?

Read, play video games, hang out at my wife’s work, editing, proofreading, brainstorming, and numerous other activities.

 

 

What sort of research do you do for your novels?

If anything comes up that is beyond my knowledge I try and research to get a better idea to add credibility to whatever project I’m working on.

 

 

Second ChancesDo you have a special place where you write?

My wife and I have a spare room that we made into an office.

 

 

 

 

 

What do you find to be the greatest advantage of self-publishing?

No long waits and having to write numerous letters to see if you’re novel will be published.

 

Conversely, what do you think self-published authors might be missing out on?

Knowing where they can improve with mechanics of their craft.

 

With the number of self-published books increasing by such a huge rate, it is really difficult for authors to make their books stand out. How do you go about this?

Marketing and promoting take a lot of time and it can be devastating at times. I try and stay positive knowing that all it takes is the right person reading and sharing via word of mouth for something to take off.

 

Mane of RedemptionWho designed your book cover/s?

 

My wife designed my book covers.

 

 Do you believe that self-published authors can produce books as high-quality as the traditional published? If so, how do you think we should go about that?

I believe there are plenty of self-published authors that could hold their own against some of the best traditionally published authors in the industry. Quality editing is one of the major keys to getting a story to a higher standard.

 

Do you write specifically for a Christian audience? Why or why not?

I do not. I believe Everyone (Christian and Non believer) can benefit from moral lessons within stories.

 

What are some of the special challenges of being a Christian writer?

 

Some words don’t have as big an impact. In On Writing: Memoir of a Craft, Stephen King said something along the lines of, “there are some instances where vulgarity is best for the impact intended.” I’m struggling with this in my current project. The main villain in the “Redemption” Series could have such a darker aura if I were able to use vulgar words in his dialogue. With the “Redemption Series” being categorized as Christian Fiction, I have to stray from not using certain language within the story. In a way I kind of enjoy the challenge of how to make a character more sinister without the use of vulgar language. My go to is body language and pauses between dialogue.

 

 

Regaining PowerDo you feel that Christian writers should focus on writing really great story or on presenting the gospel clearly in everything they write? Or is it possible to do both?

 

I believe that an author can pen a really great story, yet keep the gospel tied in somehow. In Mane of Redemption I focused on one lesson that was the theme throughout the story. I think a person can have an underlying moral lesson within a story and still produce a very intriguing story.

A prime example would be the “Narnia” series by C. S. Lewis. There are a lot of parallels between Lewis’s stories and Christian teaching, but due to the quality of writing the reader is focused on the story and not the obvious lessons they are learning along the way.

 

How do readers find you and your books? 

 

Website: aarondbrinker.wixsite.com/authorsite

Twitter: www.twitter.com/aarondbrinker

Facebook: www.facebook.com/aarondbrinker

Amazon page: https://www.amazon.com/Aaron-Brinker/e/B01N54XF59/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1


 

Anaerfell 2   Leave a comment

anaerfell-promo-coverBLURB

 

Drast, cunning but reckless, is on the hunt for admiration. Tyran, calculating but tactless, is in search of affection. Bound by a friendship thicker than blood, the two brothers have been hardened by their father’s ambitions. Drast and Tyran are forced to set aside their own hopes and dreams during their struggle to fulfill their father’s desire for immortality. Now, the two will face skin-switchers and dragons, ultimately leading to a final clash with Wolos, God of the Dead.

BIOS

 

Joshua Robertson was born in Kingman, Kansas on May 23, 1984. A graduate of Norwich High School, Robertson attended Wichita State University where he received his Masters in Social Work with minors in Psychology and Sociology. His bestselling novel, Melkorka, the first in The Kaelandur Series, was released in 2015. Known most for his Thrice Nine Legends Saga, Robertson enjoys an ever-expanding and extremely loyal following of readers. He counts R.A. Salvatore and J.R.R. Tolkien among his literary influences.

 

http://www.robertsonwrites.com/
@robertsonwrites

 

anaerfell-jc-author-picJ.C. lives in the Midwest with his wife and two dogs. He recently earned his MA in English Literature and is working on his debut novel for his own fantasy world. Despite growing up with Dungeons & Dragons, Lord of the Rings, and a collection of both Dragonlance and Forgotten Realms novels, J.C. has an abiding love of classics and spends his free time reading anything he can get his hands on.

 

http://www.crimsonedgepress.com

@jcboyd_author

 

LINKS

 

Amazon

Posted February 22, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in book promotion

Tagged with , , ,

An Insult to the Written Word?   2 comments

Author Laurie Gough wrote an article titled Self-Publishing: An Insult to the Written Word in which she argued that self-publishing devalues to the art of writing, is disrespectful, and less desirable than sharing “a cabin on a Disney cruise with Donald Trump.” To rub salt in the wound, the word “published” is put in quotation marks whenever used to refer to a self-published author.

I wondered at first whether the article was satirical, but Gough seemed serious as she insisted that traditional publishing isn’t perfect, but it’s the best system that we have because it’s the only system that includes gatekeepers.

 

As a self-published author, I think her view is short-sighted.

 

Readers make the author. Whether published by the Big Five or their own imprint, an author is nothing without her readers. In other words, readers are the ultimate gatekeepers … and always have been. When I’m looking for my next book fix on Amazon — or at Barnes & Noble or Gulliver’s Book (local bookstore), I look at a book’s title, cover and synopsis first. If those pique my interest, I read the reviews before I click “buy”. Frankly, I don’t care if the book was released by HarperCollins or CreateSpace. It’s the reviews posted by readers that I care about.

Image result for image of independent publishingGough asserted that the traditional publishing model is the best system we have, so we shouldn’t mess with it. Just because some find the Big Five publishing near-monopoly works best for them doesn’t mean it should be the only system available. To have just a handful of major players dictating who gets a piece of the publishing pie is a recipe for disaster. It would mean a world of shrinking advances for authors, missed gems for readers, and a lack of sustainability for publishers.

With self-publishing, authors can create their own imprints and function as a small press, competing with traditional publishers. I love to cite the example of Meredith Wild, an author who self-published her series, built a brand around her imprint, and scored a multimillion dollar advance for five books. Over at Breakwater Harbor Books, a group of indie authors have banned together to create their own imprint. We’re writing books instead of endlessly submitting to agents and publishers.

Gough’s main concern with self-publishing seems to be the quality of the books produced by indie authors. Which is, of course, why editors exist. Authors can and do invest in thier books and realize that they need professional help to improve on their produce to make it more enjoyable for their readers and more marketable. Why put them down for that?

I know editors and designers who work at traditional houses who take on freelance work. I can’t afford most of them, but I don’t think their quality of work goes down when they edit for an indie author. Many writers have published with traditional presses and also chosen to self-publish. Successful self-published books sometimes get picked up by publishing houses. The overlapping of the two methods keeps the industry thriving through economic turbulence. Whether we prefer traditional publishing or self-publishing, this is good news for book lovers everywhere.

With the business aspect aside, self-publishing a book is, at its core, a way for writers to express their thoughts to a wider audience. Writing is an art, a method of communication with the world at large, and part of what makes us human.

Gough softened her post with a few half-hearted words of acquiescence.

“I have nothing against people who want to self-publish, especially if they’re elderly. Perhaps they want to write their life story and have no time to learn how to write well enough to be published traditionally.”

What I found interesting is that her arguments are the same one the Big Three auto manufacturers made against upstart car companies or that network television made against cable. Lack of competition had made these old moribund companies complacent and stale. The arrival of newcomers in the field improved the product for everyone.

Yes, good writing takes time to learn. You aren’t going to get any better at it by writing pitch letters to the Big Five and the handful of agents they listen to. You get better at writing by actually writing. Indie publishing allows us to do that and then pitch our work to the only agent that truly matters … the readers.

 

Marsha Ingrao

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