Archive for the ‘economics’ Tag

Electric Car Math   5 comments

These are Fairbanks, Alaska figures.

According to Plug In America, a quality electric car (a Tesla) uses 32 kwh to go 100 miles. For the record, 100 miles is less than one-third of the way to the nearest city in Alaska. I am so looking forward to stopping overnight on my way to Anchorage since the Tesla only has a 300 mile range.

Coincidentally, my car needs to be filled about every 300 miles. $2.38 a gallon for gasoline. I know, we produce the oil, so why is gasoline so expensive here. Nobody can give us an adequate answer. Economies of scale are the explanation given, but we produce the oil, so you’d think we’d get a break on reduced shipping, but apparently not.

Image result for image of tesla carElectricity is 27 cents a kilowatt hour in Fairbanks. So to travel 300 miles in a Tesla would cost me $26.00.

My car holds 18 gallons and can take me 300 miles. That’ll set me back $43. Oh, the cost is half, so get an electric car. But ….

BUT … I need a heater or I’ll die in Alaska’s frigid temperatures. Running a heater in a gasoline engine hardly reduces the gas mileage because it’s excess heat off the engine. Running a heater in a Tesla does reduce the range … by 50%. If I wanted to drive to Anchorage, 380 miles away, I’d have to stop for gasoline in Wasilla. That would take 15 minutes (half an hour if I decide to grab some food and use the facilities) and I’d be on the road again. I would not stop to sleep along the way as it only takes about seven hours to drive 380 miles.

Image result for image 2005 ford taurus covered in snowIf I was driving a Tesla in the winter, with only 150 mile range, I’d have to stop in Healey and Wasilla and sleep overnight – $120 per night for the hotel, $60 a day for meals, and two nights of my time since it takes a Tesla 9.5 hours to achieve a full charge (assuming it can do that when it’s -30 out). So what I save in gasoline over driving electric, I more than make up in other costs.

A $400 trip to Anchorage (round-trip – gasoline, meals and assuming a decent hotel) would become a $1300 trip in an electric car, plus add four days onto my trip.

So please stop telling me about how much money I would save with an electric car versus my gasoline car. Yes, commuting to and from work in a warm climate saves you money, but those savings evaporate in a cold climate and become a liability if you need to travel any distance.



Posted February 8, 2018 by aurorawatcherak in economics, Uncategorized

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American Empire   Leave a comment

The year 2017 saw the beginning of the end for the US empire. I bade it farewell after Trump refused to sign the Paris Accord. I was fully in agreement that he shouldn’t. It hadn’t been authorized by Congress and it isn’t supported by most Americans who instinctively or knowledgeably understand that it would devastate our economy and drive us into third-world status within just a few years. But not signing the Accord meant the world would begin to look elsewhere for the next leader of the free world and I think that’s a good thing.

Britain survived its fall from the Most High status and we will too. In the long run, I think it will be better for us, but let’s just look at history first. We replaced the UK because we were more productive and forward thinking. Now that China has starting to ecclipse us, just like the UK before us, we don’t want to go quietly into that good night. Like any dying empire, our leaders are becoming increasingly ruthless, hoping to keep up appearances.

Image result for image of american empire

I know people who think our refusal to lead on “climate change” is what is causing this failure. Yeah, I don’t think so. Climate change — at least, the “human causation of climate change — will be disproven in a decade or so and whether or not we’d led the charge to roll back carbon emissions to 1930s levels would not have made the slightest bit of difference — at least not for the US. We are already lagging behind because of the extreme financial cost of warfare. It, not climate change, will be the death knell of the American empire. Since the start of the 21st century, we’ve invaded more countries than at any other time in our history. We appear to be in a perpetual state of both military and economic war.

Our combativeness, which has grown under every president since World War 2 ended is starting to make other major powers nervous and they’re now seeking to counter US aggression. Maybe they hoped we’d entangle ourselves in climate-change redtape and that would slow us down. Certainly they were hoping that the globalized economy would counter our aggression. But in reality, it is our aggression that has provided the rope that is hanging us. We’re not done yet, thanks to our somewhat unnatural alliance with the ill-conceived “United States of Europe.” That experiment is already stumbling and likely to fragment, but its leaders are hoping their alliance with the US will strengthen the EU. Meanwhile, the other major powers of the world are going full steam ahead to ensure that, when the US and EU run out of gas,  the rest of the world will carry on independently of the dying dual empires.

Understand, they aren’t merely waiting around the sidelines for the collapse to come so they can take their turn at the top of the global pecking-order. They are actively preparing their position to, as seamlessly as possible, take the baton and run.

There’s history here, of course. If we don’t learn from history, we’re destined to repeat it. So let’s learn from it.

Since the Bretton Woods Conference in 1944, the US dollar has reigned supreme as the world’s default currency. In 1944, the US held more gold than any other country, but in 1971, the US went off the gold standard, and since then, the dollar has been a fiat currency. The US has become increasingly cavalier in its abuse of the dollar—often at the expense of other countries.

Russia and China finally got tired of that and created the largest energy agreement in history not based on the US dollar. All trade between the two countries will be settled in the ruble and the yuan. Russia has since been active in creating agreements with other fuel customers, also bypassing the dollar. In creating these agreements, the Asian powers have unofficially announced the demise of the dollar in petroleum trading. For decades, the US has applied its muscle to other countries, using the strength of our dollar. So, the Sino-Russian agreement will likely end the US monopoly of price fixing in oil trading, but it will also to create a decline in US power over the world, generally.

To this end, Russian created its own SWIFT system. The official system, located in Brussels but controlled by the US, controls the vast majority of economic transactions in the world, but in recent years, the US has barred, or threatened to bar, other countries from the SWIFT system, effectively making it impossible for banks to transfer money and, by extension, causing the collapse of their banking systems. Russia got tired of that also and created its own. It’s entirely likely that, if Russian trading partners (Iran, for example) are barred from the use of the Brussels SWIFT (or even threatened to be barred), Russia would extend the use of its SWIFT to them.

That takes power away from the US. Provided Russia doesn’t use its system as a tool of intimidation, other countries may well flock to it, forcing the United States to interface with the new system or lose trade with those countries.

Meanwhile, China and Russia have been expanding their economic powers dramatically and have periodically complained that their seats at the IMF table are unrealistically low, considering their importance to world trade. In 2014, China officially replaced the US as the world’s largest economy, yet the IMF has consistently sought to minimize China’s place at the table. Can’t really blame them for being irritated by still being stuck at children’s table when they have a grownup economy.

The West believes that it is holding all the cards and that the Chinese and other powers must accept a poor-sister position, if they are to be allowed to sit at the IMF table at all. The West does not appear to recognize that, if frozen out, the other powers have the ability to create alternatives. As with the SWIFT system, the Asian powers have reacted to US overreach, not by going away licking their wounds, but by creating a second IMF.

The Russian State Duma (the lower house of the Russian legislature) have now created the New Development Bank. It will have a $100 billion pool, to be used for the BRICS countries. Its five members will contribute equally to its funding, instead of how the US slowly bankrupts itself by being the primary contributor to the system in controls. The BRICS bank will be centered in Shanghai. India will serve as the first five-year rotating president and the first chairman of the board of directors will come from Brazil. The first chairman of the board of governors is likely to be Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov. It’s therefore structured to be truly multinational, instead of a western monopoly of power.

In creating all of the above entities, the BRICS will, in effect, have created a complete second economic world. So much for Mutually Assured Economic Destruction. And thank God!

In the latter days of the British Empire, the British seemed to be under the illusion that, even as their power base crumbled, maybe they could retain control by threats and bluster. The UK was utterly wrong and only succeeded in alienating trading partners, colonies, and allies by doing so.

The same is happening today. China, Russia, and the rest of the world, when faced with American threats and bluster, will not simply fold their tents and accept that the US must be obeyed. They will, instead, create alternatives. And they are doing so exceedingly quickly and with unexpected competence. At this point, the overreach of the US is not only enabling other powers to rise, it is forcing their hand to literally create the next full-blown empire.

Wouldn’t it be so much better, Americans, if we accepted our declining status, pulled back much of our far-flung empire and fortified our position in the coming changing environment? It took England generations to become healthy once more because they refused to accept reality. Let’s return to what we were in the 19th and early 20th century – not an empire, but a highly productive nation of innovative and freedom-loving people with largely friendly trading relationships all over the world. Then we don’t have to worry about being dragged off our pedestal. We can simply go about our business and not give other countries reasons to hate and attack us.

I know, unrealistic. If we let go of our position in the world we won’t be great anymore and we can’t have that. The horror!

Dangers of Government Control   Leave a comment

We are a nation of 325 million people. We have a bit of control over the behavior of our 535 elected representatives in Congress, the president and the vice president. But there are seven unelected people who have life-and-death control over our economy and hence our lives — the seven governors of the Federal Reserve Board.

The Federal Reserve Board controls our money supply. Its governors are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate and serve 14-year staggered terms. They have the power to cripple an economy, as they did during the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Their inept monetary policy threw the economy into the Great Depression, during which real output in the United States fell nearly 30 percent and the unemployment rate soared as high as nearly 25 percent. The most often stated cause of the Great Depression is the October 1929 stock market crash. Little is further from the truth. The Great Depression was caused by a massive government failure led by the Federal Reserve’s rapid 25 percent contraction of the money supply.

The next government failure was the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act, which increased U.S. tariffs by more than 50 percent. Those failures were compounded by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal legislation. Leftists love to praise New Deal interventionist legislation. But FDR’s very own treasury secretary, Henry Morgenthau, saw the folly of the New Deal, writing: “We have tried spending money. We are spending more than we have ever spent before and it does not work. … We have never made good on our promises. … I say after eight years of this Administration we have just as much unemployment as when we started … and an enormous debt to boot!”

The bottom line is that the Federal Reserve Board, the Smoot-Hawley tariffs and Roosevelt’s New Deal policies turned what would have been a two, three- or four-year sharp downturn into a 16-year affair.

Here’s my question never asked about the Federal Reserve Act of 1913: How much sense does it make for us to give seven unelected people life-and-death control over our economy and hence our lives?

While you’re pondering that question, consider another: Should we give the government, through the Federal Communications Commission, control over the internet?

During the Clinton administration, along with the help of a Republican-dominated Congress, the visionary 1996 Telecommunications Act declared it “the policy of the United States” that internet service providers and websites be “unfettered by Federal or State regulation.” The act sought “to promote competition and reduce regulation in order to secure lower prices and higher quality services for American telecommunications consumers and encourage the rapid deployment of new telecommunications technologies.”

In 2015, the Obama White House pressured the FCC to create the Open Internet Order, which has been branded by its advocates as net neutrality. This move overthrew the spirit of the Telecommunications Act. It represents creeping FCC jurisdiction, as its traditional areas of regulation — such as broadcast media and telecommunications — have been transformed by the internet, or at least diminished in importance.

Fortunately, it’s being challenged by the new FCC chairman, Ajit Pai, who has announced he will repeal the FCC’s heavy-handed 2015 internet regulations. The United States has been the world leader in the development of internet technology precisely because it has been relatively unfettered by federal and state regulation. The best thing that the U.S. Congress can do for internet entrepreneurs and internet consumers is to send the FCC out to pasture as it did with the Civil Aeronautics Board, which regulated the airline industry, and the Interstate Commerce Commission, which regulated the trucking industry. When we got rid of those regulatory agencies, we saw a greater number of competitors, and consumers paid lower prices. Giving the FCC the same medicine would allow our high-tech industry to maintain its world leadership position.

Source: Dangers of Government Control

Walter E. Williams is the John M. Olin distinguished professor of economics at George Mason University, and a nationally syndicated columnist. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web page.

Copyright © 2017


RIP Sam’s Club   Leave a comment

Sam’s Clubs around the country are being closed, proof positive — according to some of my Democratic friends, that the economy is not doing as well as people think it is.

Image result for image of sam's club closingSam’s doesn’t mean that much to me. We used to be members, but when we stopped spending on credit, we went through a couple of years where we couldn’t afford Sam’s in our budget and by the time we could afford to budget for it again, we were out of the habit of using them. We’d started buying bulk at a local feed store and we’d discovered the Internet, so Sam’s was redundant.

I do acknowledge that it will be hard for some people to lose Sam’s. Small businesses who need bulk items – cups, coffee, etc. – will feel the pinch. Big families who buy bulk. A friend of ours who is a meat connoisseur who buys his meat in primals and does his own butchering. But for our family, it really wasn’t worth the membership. And 150 people lost their jobs here locally and in a community of only 100,000 people, that’s a hit.

But why did Sam’s close? According to our newspaper here, Sam’s nationwide is restructuring and that’s a complicated story. It belongs to the same corporation that Walmart and Walgreen’s belong to. Although Sam’s has not been unprofitable, it has not been growing as fast as Walmart and the fact that about 12 of the closed locations will be turned into e-commerce distribution centers, suggests Sam’s is looking into the future. These new centers will help Sam’s Club build out its e-commerce capabilities by giving it a wider fulfillment network, potentially helping it get online orders delivered to customers faster.

Increasing its commitment to e-commerce may help Sam’s Club compete with wholesale rivals like Cosco and Boxed. E-commerce is becoming more of a focus in wholesale retail, and if Sam’s Club doesn’t invest in it, the company may get left behind. Costco is a major competitor to Sam’s Club (and there’s one in Anchorage, but not in Fairbanks), and in its most recently reported quarter, its e-commerce comparable sales jumped nearly 44% year over year. Additionally, Boxed, an e-commerce only wholesale startup, is starting to establish itself. Sam’s Club’s e-commerce gross merchandise value (GMV) has been between 20% and 29% year over year in recent quarters, Sam’s Club told Business Insider Intelligence. These new fulfillment centers may help the company strengthen this growth, as it looks to better compete in wholesale online.

Turning physical stores into distribution centers is also way for Walmart to leverage its brick-and-mortar network. Walmart has a virtually unmatched brick-and-mortar network — its CEO has estimated that it has a brick-and-mortar location within 10 miles of 90% of the US population. The retailer has made efforts to entice consumers to pickup online orders in-store, but turning underperforming stores into full-blown e-commerce distribution centers as Sam’s Club is doing is another way to take advantage of its proximity to its consumers. If Walmart, and Sam’s Club, hope to thrive online, they’ll need to offer fast delivery times to rival Amazon, and having e-commerce distribution centers close to customers should help with that.

Just as the Piggly Wiggly’s ran the full-service grocery store out of business, online e-commerce is sucking away the business of physical locations. But Amazon isn’t a monopoly yet and it is struggling with its network (hence, it’s desire to build a second HQ). If Walmart moves into ecommerce in a big way, utilizing former Sam’s Club locations as fulfillment centers, it potentially becomes a major contender against Amazon.

It sucks for Alaska because we have to pay individual shipping rather than allowing Sam’s to spread that cost in bulk, but we can still use Cosco, which is in Anchorage and has been suggesting for years that it might move to Fairbanks. They no longer have any competition here, so they just might. And, if they don’t, a local trucking company is advertising that they will be doing twice-a-month 380-mile runs with people’s personalized shopping lists. Yeah, it’s the return to the full-service grocery store.

Ultimately, Sam’s Club is an example of creative destruction. By closing many of their locations, they allow their parent company to become healthier and better able to face the changing needs of a 21st Century society. In 10 years, people will wonder why we went through all the hassle of traveling to a big warehouse to pick up stuff, wandering by stuff we don’t need, but then decide to buy, then try to fit it into our cars when we can now just make our selections online and have it delivered to our door by freight drone.


Posted January 20, 2018 by aurorawatcherak in economics, Uncategorized

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Stealing From Your Neighbor Through Subsidies   Leave a comment

In 2017, the Montana Public Service Commission approved (4 to 1) the renewal of Commnet Wireless’s Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (ETC) certification, authorizing that company to receive a federal “Lifeline” subsidy of $34.25 for every customer on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation – an amount sufficient to render their service free to most users. Previously, this same company received $2.2 million in Universal Service Fund (USF) “high cost” subsidies to build their infrastructure in Rosebud County. This subsidy paid for all of their capital costs in establishing their business, debt-free, while producing for them a tidy annual profit of almost $1 million.

Image result for image of fiber optic cableIt seems that Commnet Wireless is “living the American Dream” – at everyone else’s expense. But that’s not a rare circumstance.


The Universal Service Fund was first created by Congress in 1934 then greatly expanded under the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (Clinton was President). It is funded by a dedicated federal tax on consumer phone bills. This, ironically, makes the very services Congress wishes to expand less affordable, especially to lower-income Americans. The program is premised on the belief that an ever-expanding set of telecommunications services are the “right” of all citizens, and should thus be made “universal” by the generosity of Washington’s re-distributional political class.

The program started with landlines, then expanded to wireless and is now being applied to broadband — and not just any broadband, but high-speed fiber-delivered broadband. The Lifeline program gives away free cell phones and subsidizes low-income and tribal households. The Connect America Fund and “High Cost” programs directly subsidize telephone companies, as well as schools, libraries and rural health care facilities to provide “free” Internet. USF’s total annual budget is currently $10.5 billion, or $84 per American household.

That’s a month of Internet at my home, where I can’t get high-speed broadband because the infrastructure doesn’t exist. We can get “high-speed” DSL that drops out 2-3 times a day because people are making phone calls or cable Internet which is slower than high-speed fiber. I’ve never lived anywhere that offered high-speed broadband because our local Internet providers just don’t see a profit in providing it and permitting laws don’t allow competition. So do I have a “right” to high-speed fiber-delivered broadband? I haven’t died without it up to this point and we’ll pursue that thought further down.

Like all federal programs, USF proceeds blindly with the assumption that shoveling federal dollars at something automatically produces the desired outcomes – outcomes that would not otherwise happen if people were left to spend more of their own money, and the marketplace was allowed to respond to human needs and desires absent government intervention. It’s not surprising to learn then, that the FCC has never reliably measured to what extent the subsidized telecommunications services would have expanded just as much – or more – into the targeted high-cost areas, without any subsidies needed – and done so at lower cost. Dollars spent are considered a successful outcome regardless of actual outcomes.

In Alaska, rural villages and the Native corporations that they own came to the conclusion that, since the cities don’t have fiber-based high-speed broadband yet, the villages would have to provide it for themselves. Internet is currently provided via satellite and it sucks. Several corporations made a decision to contract with Anchorage-based Quintillion for a land- and sea-based fiber-optic cable network with an overall capacity of 30 terabits per second. Each of the five communities in the network currently will have access to up to 200 gigabits of data per second. If demand increases, the capacity can be increased according to Quintillion. It went live December 13. Four other villages will be added this coming summer.

This is a side project to a planned Tokyo to London fiber cable. It’s being financied by Leonard Blavatnik, one of the world’s wealthiest individuals, through the Cooper Investment Fund, but there are also Alaska-based investors including subsidiaries of Native corporations Arctic Slope Regional Corp. and Calista Corp, two of the largest “private” companies in Alaska. Eventually, this cable is expected to provide fiber-delivered Internet to Fairbanks and Anchorage.

So what do we learn from that? The time has come to re-think wealth transfer schemes like the USF, that eliminate price signals, supplant the free market, and create the net effect of increased government dependency and a culture of entitlement. As with any other good or service in a free economy, consumer demand for rural high-speed broadband should be based on the willingness of consumers to pay for the full cost of that service – not based on political pandering that subsidizes one man at another’s expense. A shell game with predetermined winners and losers, lacking any credible metrics and amounting to little more than a glorified multi-billion dollar welfare program.

Saying we “want” something as long as somebody else pays for it is not “demand”. Currently, broadband build-out into high-cost areas is based almost entirely on artificial demand – created by subsidy – rather than on true demand, created by value-seeking consumers in the marketplace, responding to the price signals of true cost. If consumers in outlying areas value fiber-delivered high-speed internet enough to pay the full cost, then we have genuine demand and the market will see to it that these services are provided – without any government involvement.

If consumers are unwilling to pay the true cost, then demand does not exist, and presumably won’t exist until private enterprise finds ways of delivering better service at a lower price. But that incentive disappears when the government steps in. Saying we “want” something as long as somebody else pays for it is not demand. It is little more than theft dressed up by the agency and power of government. Personal responsibility – the foundational principle of a free society – is replaced with “but I want it, so you should pay for it.”

According to my research, you can get high-speed broadband for $30 a month in New York City. Here in Alaska’s second-largest city, I can get slower cable-based Internet for $100 a month — actually, I could get cable Internet for as low as $60 a month, but you can’t watch Netflix without going over the monthly limit. Of course, we don’t have high-speed broadband because the current cost for building broadband or wireless infrastructure into rural and low-population areas is obviously higher on a per-customer basis – perhaps 50 to 100 percent more. One of the fundamental principles of sound economics is the alignment of benefits with costs. When you subsidize a good or service, you can no longer know what people are actually willing to pay as consumers because the government has gotten somebody else to pay for them.

This arrangement tends to convince rural customers that the full price is “unjust” to those who have chosen to live in the country. At the same time, it obstructs the very progress that would bring lower prices about. The subsidized companies have a reduced incentive to economize and to innovate since their profit is all but guaranteed without it.

Public service commissioners everywhere need to understand that it is not the job of the state commissions to rubber stamp federal programs that evidence shows are harmful in the long run to the people they serve. Subsidies like USF produce obvious beneficiaries. Government giveaways always do. They are highly visible. The market-driven benefits produced by those same dollars, left in the hands of those who earned them, are always far greater, but cannot be specifically identified. They become the opportunities lost, the blessings of liberty that were aborted before their birth.

Thus, government creates an illusion of value and benefit, when in reality all it has done is substitute government spending for spending in the marketplace by the frugal, self-interested, wage-earning consumer. The fantasy of a net benefit is bestowed on the person who wasn’t involved in the working or the earning – convinced by politicians that he had it coming all along. Surely, high-speed broadband is in the Constitution somewhere.

Once established, climbing out of the Subsidy Entitlement Pit is never easy. The smoke and mirrors of perceived benefit are so effective, that it becomes very difficult for elected officeholders to do the right thing, by choosing freedom over political security. It is far easier to avoid criticism and “go with the flow.”

To be sure, doing the right thing and doing the easy thing are rarely companions that walk the same path. Doing the right thing requires an extra measure of principle, courage and integrity, something most politicians and government workers lack.

What this comes down to is not just an economic consideration, but also the need to educate people on just what is a “right”. I have no right to anyone else’s stuff. I only have a right to what I can produce myself or trade with others from what I can produce myself.

So, for example, I am a writer and administrator. I make money from both of these endeavors. I can take the money and buy stuff with it, stuff that someone else has produced. One-hundred dollars of my earnings go every month to my cable provider to provide Internet service. I don’t have cable television or this would be the biggest bill in my budget. I get what I get. From the perspective of someone with fiber-delivered high-speed broadband, my Internet service is clunky. But would I be willing to pay $200 a month for fiber? No way! I simply don’t have that sort of wriggle room in my budget. If it were available for that cost, I would continue with the service I have now because I make choices of what to do with my money.

My neighbor says he wants high-speed Internet, but he isn’t willing to pay $200 for it. So, he petitions the cable company and the city government to apply for ETC funds. Pretty soon, my cable bill increases because the company is trying to finance fiber. Also my telephone and cable bill taxes increase. Now, even though I have elected to stay with ordinary Internet service because I don’t want to pay for fiber, I am paying for my neighbor’s fiber.

That’s theft. And there is no scenario where you can say that you have a right to steal from someone else, even if you do it through a government program.


Fascism & Communism   Leave a comment

Before the question, how about a few statistics? The 20th century was mankind’s most brutal century. Roughly 16 million people lost their lives during World War I; about 60 million died during World War II. Wars during the 20th century cost an estimated 71 million to 116 million lives (

Found on Lew Rockwell

The number of war dead pales in comparison with the number of people who lost their lives at the hands of their own governments. The late professor Rudolph J. Rummel of the University of Hawaii documented this tragedy in his book “Death by Government: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900.” Some of the statistics found in the book have been updated at

The People’s Republic of China tops the list, with 76 million lives lost at the hands of the government from 1949 to 1987. The Soviet Union follows, with 62 million lives lost from 1917 to 1987. Adolf Hitler’s Nazi German government killed 21 million people between 1933 and 1945. Then there are lesser murdering regimes, such as Nationalist China, Japan, Turkey, Vietnam and Mexico. According to Rummel’s research, the 20th century saw 262 million people’s lives lost at the hands of their own governments (

Hitler’s atrocities are widely recognized, publicized and condemned. World War II’s conquering nations’ condemnation included denazification and bringing Holocaust perpetrators to trial and punishing them through lengthy sentences and execution. Similar measures were taken to punish Japan’s murderers.

Death by Government: G…R. J. RummelBest Price: $32.96Buy New $41.42(as of 10:00 EST – Details)

But what about the greatest murderers in mankind’s history — the Soviet Union’s Josef Stalin and China’s Mao Zedong? Some leftists saw these communists as heroes. W.E.B. Du Bois, writing in the National Guardian in 1953, said, “Stalin was a great man; few other men of the 20th century approach his stature. … The highest proof of his greatness (was that) he knew the common man, felt his problems, followed his fate.” Walter Duranty called Stalin “the greatest living statesman” and “a quiet, unobtrusive man.” There was even leftist admiration for Hitler and fellow fascist Benito Mussolini. When Hitler came to power in January 1933, George Bernard Shaw described him as “a very remarkable man, a very able man.” President Franklin Roosevelt called the fascist Mussolini “admirable,” and he was “deeply impressed by what he (had) accomplished.”

In 1972, John Kenneth Galbraith visited Communist China and praised Mao and the Chinese economic system. Michel Oksenberg, President Jimmy Carter’s China expert, complained, “America (is) doomed to decay until radical, even revolutionary, change fundamentally alters the institutions and values.” He urged us to “borrow ideas and solutions” from China. Harvard University professor John K. Fairbank believed that America could learn much from the Cultural Revolution, saying, “Americans may find in China’s collective life today an ingredient of personal moral concern for one’s neighbor that has a lesson for us all.” By the way, an estimated 2 million people died during China’s Cultural Revolution. More recent praise for murdering tyrants came from Anita Dunn, President Barack Obama’s acting communications director in 2009, who said, “Two of my favorite political philosophers (are) Mao Zedong and Mother Teresa.”

Recall the campus demonstrations of the 1960s, in which campus radicals, often accompanied by their professors, marched around singing the praises of Mao and waving Mao’s Little Red Book. That may explain some of the campus mess today. Some of those campus radicals are now tenured professors and administrators at today’s universities and colleges and K-12 schoolteachers and principals indoctrinating our youth.

Now the question: Why are leftists soft on communism? The reason leftists give communists, the world’s most horrible murderers, a pass is that they sympathize with the chief goal of communism: restricting personal liberty. In the U.S., the call is for government control over our lives through regulations and taxation. Unfortunately, it matters little whether the Democrats or Republicans have the political power. The march toward greater government control is unabated. It just happens at a quicker pace with Democrats in charge.


Walter E. Williams is the John M. Olin distinguished professor of economics at George Mason University, and a nationally syndicated columnist. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web page.

Copyright © 2017


Independence Hypocrisy   1 comment

Image result for image of walter e williamsOfficials in Catalonia, Spain’s richest and most highly industrialized region, whose capital is Barcelona, recently held a referendum in which there was a 92 percent vote in favor of independence from Spain. The Spanish authorities opposed the referendum and claimed that independence is illegal. Catalans are not the only Europeans seeking independence. Some Bavarian people are demanding independence from Germany, while others demand greater autonomy. Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court ruled: “In the Federal Republic of Germany … states are not ‘masters of the constitution.’ … Therefore, there is no room under the constitution for individual states to attempt to secede. This violates the constitutional order.”

Germany has done in Bavaria what Spain and Italy, in its Veneto region, have done; it has upheld the integrity of state borders. There is an excellent article written by Joseph E. Fallon, a research associate at the UK Defence Forum, titled “The Catalan Referendum, regional pressures, the EU, and the ‘Ghosts’ of Eastern Europe” ( Fallon writes that by doing what it’s doing in Bavaria, “Berlin is violating international law on national self-determination. It denies to Bavaria what it granted to the 19 states that seceded from Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union. In fact, Germany rushed to be first to recognize the independence of Slovenia and Croatia.” It did that, according to Beverly Crawford, an expert on Europe at the University of California, Berkeley, “in open disregard of (a European Community) agreement to recognize the two states under EC conditionality requirements.”

The secessionist movements in Spain, Germany and Italy have encountered resistance and threats from the central governments, and in Catalonia’s case, secessionist leaders have been jailed. The central governments of Spain, Germany and Italy have resisted independence despite the fact that they are signatories to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which holds that “all peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.”

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Fallon notes the hypocrisy of Spain, Germany and Italy, as well as the entire European Union. Back in 1991, the EC — the precursor to the EU — “issued its conditions for recognizing the unilateral declarations of independence by states seceding from Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union.” Fallon argues that these same guidelines should be applied to the states of Catalonia, Bavaria and Veneto. Isn’t it double talk for members of the EU to condemn independence movements today, given that they welcomed and supported independence movements for states that were members of the communist bloc?

Catalonia, Bavaria and Veneto are relatively prosperous jurisdictions in their countries. They feel that what they get from the central governments is not worth the taxes they pay. Each wants the central government off its back. They think they could be far more prosperous on their own. That should sound familiar. Some of the motivation for secessionist movements in Europe is similar to the motivation found in the Confederacy’s independence movement of the early 1860s.

Throughout most of our nation’s history, the only sources of federal revenue were excise taxes and tariffs. In the 1830s, the North used its power in Congress to push through massive tariffs to fund the government. During the 1850s, tariffs amounted to 90 percent of federal revenue. The Southern states were primarily producers of agricultural products, which they exported to Europe. In return, they imported manufactured goods. These tariffs fell much harder upon the export-dependent South than they did upon the more insular North. In 1859, Southern ports paid 75 percent of federal tariff revenue. However, the majority of the tariff revenue generated was spent on projects that benefited the North.

Tariffs being a contributing cause of the Civil War is hardly ever mentioned. Using the abolition of slavery as an excuse for a war that took the lives of 620,000 Americans confers greater moral standing for the Union.


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