Archive for the ‘#characterdevelopment’ Tag

Conflicted Character   Leave a comment

A Threatening Fragility Front CoverI like when my characters have internal conflicts — emotional, ethical, or mental struggles — while trying to decide what to do about the external problem that drives the plot. The challenge isn’t a physical thing, but a struggle within the protagonist to make the right choice.

Why?

An external task that’s easy to complete often lacks tension and unpredictability, which leads to boring stories. Adding an emotional roadblock makes the task much more interesting.

What needs to be done is clear, but the protagonist doesn’t want to resolve it that way for personal reasons. Either the right choice has consequences he doesn’t want to suffer, or there is no good choice—whatever he does has serious ramifications.

Internal conflicts require a fully-developed understanding of the character, because these conundrums are based on who the protagonist is because of what has happened to him or her in life, and this past makes it harder for him to make decisions and resolve external challenges. They typically come from the morals and ethics of the character, and, more often than not, choosing one side negates the other, and the protagonist can’t have it both ways.

So how do you set up internal conundrums for your characters?

Just as every real person has a set of morals or values that they like to think they would never violate, a character who is more than a plaster saint must also have lines they won’t cross easily. What a character thinks is true affect his behavior. If the “right” choice contradicts what the protagonist holds as true, he’s going to struggle to make that choice. Nothing builds conflict like some serious soul searching and nothing causes soul searching like being asked to contradict your deeply-held beliefs. That can create a lot of fun conflict to play with in a novel.

How a character believes other people should be treated will also affect how she makes a decision—and sometimes these are much harder to reconcile. For example, if the protagonist believes killing is wrong, any choice that requires killing someone will be met with fierce resistance. Morality is rooted in personal rules and laws about acceptable behavior. But if killing is the only way to save someone she loves or to prevent something terrible from happening, a character might be tempted. Doing a bad thing for a greater good can be a persuasive argument … and a slippery slope to disaster. There’s the post-traumatic stress disorder, the dark night of the soul, the belief that others are judging you for your actions, and that fact that now that killing is on the table, you might not be able to take it back. Think of Rick in the Walking Dead. “We don’t kill the living.” Once they had to kill the living, however, it became easier to justify killing the living, but not any easier to live with the guilt that follows.

Sometimes a character wants to do things he knows are wrong. It could be a lie or a theft. What he wants to do goes against what he knows is right, and a lot of conflict is possible as he tries his best to rationalize why it’s okay to do it anyway. Such ethical slip-and-slides can be compelling problems for your protagonist to regret and have to deal with at the worst possible time in the story.

Fear is a powerful motivator for stepping outside your morality. If a character is focused on survival, he might make bad decisions that go against his morality. Maybe a character who would normally intervene when a woman is being abused chooses not to step out of the shadows because there’s a mob doing the abusing. Being too afraid to do the right thing is a conflict nearly everyone can relate to.

Shame is also a powerful emotion. People can ignore their ethics and personal beliefs if it means saving themselves from a terrible secret being revealed. They’ll act to avoid standing out or looking foolish, which can keep them from doing the right thing at the right time to prevent a problem. Someone who witnessed a crime while doing something embarrassing isn’t likely to tell anyone for fear his own transgression will be exposed.

Internal conflicts are fun opportunities to put the protagonist in the hot seat and force him to decide who he really is and what he really stands for. How far is he willing to go to help a friend? What will he risk? What does he value? His struggles while making a decision shows readers who he really is as a person. And it all makes for a much more interesting story.A Threatening Fragility Front Cover

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Character Relationships   Leave a comment

Image result for image of character interactionCharacter building is a crucial step in the creative writing process. If you tend to be a plot-driven writer, you may become too focused on creating and developing isolated character profiles and overlook one of the most crucial aspects of character-building: the relationships that exist between these characters. Yet, it is the interconnectedness of characters that provides the framework for fictional society. A fictional world would collapse if not for the networks of people and creatures who hold it up.

Writing believable character relationships requires some thought about how real relationships work. What motivates people to interact harmoniously or to be confrontational? How do those interactions take place?

The best characterizations come from observing actual human interactions. People are very distinctive and these differences form the attraction that draws us together and forms lasting bonds.

Authentic dialogue can divulge a wealth of information about the character’s personality and feelings towards another character. It is a way of bringing the malleable relationships between these characters to life. Unless you’ve trapped your characters in an elevator or a cross-country car ride, avoid information dump dialogue. You just don’t need to tell your readers so much about a character in a huge slug. Moreover, you also should try to recreate verbal interactions from real life down to its finest details. Readers want authentic dialogue, but the dialogue should always play a role in developing plot, characters or character relationships.

Aim to write dialogue that is purposeful. Think of dialogue that incorporate actions (whether it be a lingering glance or a re-adjusting of the collar) or dialogue that intrigues the reader and prompts questions.

 

To a certain extent, it is hard to write characters who are not based on people you know. While you don’t want to suck your friends into your make-believe world, you can borrow their habits, worldviews, and politics. Even better is if you can find something ironic in that person’s character, you can create a truly believable character. For instance, an outwardly cynical person who has a hidden tenderness — for cats or birds, for example — is much more believable because nobody is completely consistent in all of their ways.

Character relationships lacking tension can feel flat and one-dimensional. Characters shouldn’t be constantly fighting each other — even enemies sometimes find common ground, but no two people can interact without their flaws occasionally causing conflict with those around them.

Ah, flaws! We wish we could write perfect human beings, but they’re so boring. A character who is slow to trust others romantically might have had a damaging romantic experience in his past. This allows you to leak some backstory into your character’s interactions in the plot of the novel. Character traits that impact individuals and the people around them negatively also create tension.

 

 

Even characters who are similar should have traits that cause friction in some situations. Right now, I’m writing characters in Transformation Project who see things differently from one another when it comes to handling food distribution. Will they come to a compromise or will they fail to prepare for coming martial law because they can’t agree?

Just as the plot of a novel should show development, so should character relationships. While some relationships may be fairly fixed, primary intimate relations should ebb, flow and change. In journalism, we ask 5 “w” questions that can be used to tweak character relationships. “Who, what, why, where and when”.

By tweaking the 5 W’s you can explore the cause and effect and make sure that any momentous change reverberates through your characters’ primary relationships. You should resist the temptation for characters to instantly like each other because that skips the interesting parts of getting to know each other. The problem with characters instantly liking each other is that this skips the interesting elements of character introductions. You can create curiosity and narrative tension out of the fact each character is still somewhat unknown to the other.

It’s entirely possible, of course, that two characters feel instant physical attraction, but building connection through multiple encounters makes this attraction feel earned. This creates curiosity for the reader and provides a means of narrative tension.

Jazz thinks Shane is sexy, but she also knows he’s dangerous and that isn’t attractive for her. While his gentle moments compel her, she is repelled by his anger and secretiveness. Will something change later? I’m not telling except to say that other men are much more interested in her than Shane is currently. He seems very determined to remain single, even though he admits Jazz makes him warm.

Know your characters inside out. Know things you don’t share with the reader. It’s easier to create believable relationships when you have a multi-dimensional understanding of each of your characters. Note essential facts about each character, even if many won’t get mentioned in your story. Knowing more about each character than you’ll need in the final story will keep characters vivid in your mind’s eye. This will translate to the page, especially when you describe character relationships and are able to bring in your characters’ most crucial attributes and differences.

Literature is replete with believable, engrossing, developing relationships. If a specific type of character relationship is central to your story (such as a life-altering friendship or romance), find books where these feature and make a summary of the course of the relationship. Take notes on characters’ first interactions and their last. Take notes too on any disagreements in the course of the book and why they arise. How do the characters’ personalities complement each other? What differences created the conflicts.”They have history”. Three words that explain the air of distance and awkwardness lingering between two individuals. It’s important to remember that your characters have a history that often transcends the boundaries of the story at hand.

“They have history”. Three words that explain the air of distance and awkwardness lingering between two individuals. It’s important to remember that your characters have a history that often transcends the boundaries of the story at hand.sk yourself, how do your characters’ pasts intertwine with one another?

In Transformation Project, Shane is returning home after being gone for a long time, during which his former girlfriend married his brother. There’s still feelings between these two now-grown teen lovers, but there’s also this new dynamic because Cai is involved in the relationship. Meanwhile, Jazz (and others) have come into Shane’s life to draw his feelings in another direction. Even though Transformation Project is not a romance, I use these tensions to make the character interactions more interesting, more like real life in a small town. I mined some interactions from a small Alaska town from 30 years ago, so I know the intertwined relationships between the two brothers and Marnie are authentic.

It sets up my readers to ask the “why” question. What happened to make Shane so closed off? Why doesn’t he still love the woman he was entranced with for seven years? Once the questions are out there floating in the minds of the reader, I gradually interweave some backstory into my tale.

Remember, relevant backstory is a finite resource. Don’t blow your wad too soon in your story. You don’t want to use up your resource. Just tease enough to keep your readers engaged.

Character motivation directly stems from character backstory. You should explore the ways backstory causes characters to clash, but you should also explore their disparate motivations and examine the potential conflicts that may arise.

Ask yourself, how do the drives and standpoints of each character differ? If a group of people in your story are working together, but end up having vastly conflicting final goals, how will this damage their ability to cooperate?

Discover what motivates your characters, then examine the ways in which those motivations support or undermine each other.

Character evolution is the key to any good story. Sometimes your protagonist is changing the world and other times he’s the one doing t he changing. Character arcs are ultimately the whole point of fiction. The plot is merely a backdrop to what the characters are doing.

Moreover, examine not only how each character progresses through their journey, but also how those journeys intertwine with one another.

Consider how changes in one character’s mindset impact their interactions with other characters. Explore how dynamics between different characters shift over time because of such changes.

Perhaps two sworn enemies become friends when they realize that they have more in common than they thought. Perhaps these two friends revert back to being enemies when an act of betrayal breaks their trust in one another and consequently forces them apart.

Ask yourself: What lessons do the characters (and the reader) learn from each of those encounters? How do their encounters with other characters shape their own transformations as a person?

Don’t ignore your minor characters. Though less prominent than your major characters, they still play a vital role because they ensure the integrity of your novel or piece of fiction. The exchanges that occur between them may be slight, subtle and seemingly trivial, yet these small exchanges become necessary nuances in your story.

If your story world is a lattice, then the minor characters are the final strips of wood that lock everything into place and ensure the overall structure’s cohesion. The purpose of minor characters for the reader is not to know their stories; it’s to know that they each have a story, to know that they are as much a part of the story world as your major characters.

So let every encounter between your characters be important. Remember that it’s when you as the writer understand the significance of character relationships that you are able to most profoundly understand the characters themselves.

It’s time to get writing and get exploring! A world of meaningful character interactions awaits.

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