Archive for the ‘authors’ Tag

The Radicals’ Rancorous Rage | Becky Akers   Leave a comment

I ran across this Becky Akers article discussing the Radical Patriots, who are featured in her book Abducting Arnold, which is on my winter reading list.

Source: The Radicals’ Rancorous Rage | Becky Akers

Becky’s is a refreshing alternative take on Benedict Arnold that brings in some little known American history.

Interview with Lela Markham   Leave a comment

The Open Book Blog Hop interviewed our fellow writers this week and Nicole Sorrell asked me these 7 questions.

http://www.nicolesorrell.com/nicolesblog/2016/1/30/lela-markham-answers-seven-questions

This week in our blog hop we’re interviewing other authors!

Lela Markham

LELA MARKHAM

Lela Markham is the pen name of an Alaskan novelists who was raised in a home built of books. Alaska is a grand adventure like none other with a culture that embraces summer adventure and winter artistic pursuits.

A multi-genre writer, currently Lela is concentrating on dystopian and fantasy, but you never know what her imagination might get up to.

Lela shares her life with her adventuresome husband, two fearless offspring and a sentient husky who keeps a yellow Lab for a pet.

You can stalk her at:

aurorawatcherak@wordpress.com
thewillowbranch@wordpress.com
www.facebook.com/lelamarkham7
Or reach out old-school at lelamarkham@gmail.com

Lela, the first question is: What sort of conditions are most conducive to your productivity? 

My mother operated a daycare center out of our home when I was in high school, so I actually don’t have an “ideal” productivity zone. I don’t mind chaos, noise, etc. I write where I am and when I can, so I get a lot done.

Lela, If you had to co-author a book, who would be your ideal partner and why? 

Click to see on Amazon

CLICK TO SEE ON AMAZON

If I had to co-author a book – I wouldn’t choose to do that because I have been part of collaborative writing teams before and they usually don’t work out. But, if I HAD to – I think it would be my daughter. She’s an artist-musician who writes song lyrics – so a poet – and I would love to have a fantasy book with lots of musical poetry in it. I don’t care for my own poetry, but I enjoy hers. I think we could work together on a book where I provide the narrative and she provides the poetry, that way we would not step on each other’s toes and a collaborative writing team might work that way.

What’s your least favorite aspect of being a writer?

Formatting for paperback. Ugh!

If you could have one superpower, what would it be, Lela?

I’ve always loved the idea of telekinesis, although I would settle for a magic wand that magically formats for paperback without costing any money.

What’s your favorite food?

Click to see on Amazon

CLICK TO SEE ON AMAZON

My dad was a professional chef and my mother was a diner waitress-cook, so I was not permitted as a child to develop a favorite food. You ate what they were serving and sometimes that was what the customers wouldn’t eat. So it would be easier to say what my least favorite food is than what my favorite is because I learned to like a lot of food. That said, my favorite cuisine is Chinese food. I cook a lot of Asian inspired dishes. And, I brake for chocolate cheesecake with a big mug of coffee.

Tell us about the one place you’ve been that you never want to go back to and why?

The Newark Airport. We got stuck there one time and it was horrible – confusing alleyways (I mean corridors) and rude people, maggots on the salad, filthy . The airlines wanted us to fly standby and send our 7 year old and 2 year old individually on different airplanes. They didn’t seem to think we should have a problem with that. So, I have tried hard to never fly through Newark since.

Lela, out of all the characters you’ve written, which is your favorite and why?

Wow, an absolutely favorite character? That’s sort of liking asking a mother which of her children she loves more. But… Jacob Delaney from Transportation Project series. He’s 95 years old, so has such a rich backstory to draw from … he’s outspoken, hardy, a devout Christian who loves his family fiercely … and he’s an anarchist.

Stay Tuned for the Blog Hop!   Leave a comment

This week’s blog hop topic is “What’s your favorite decade so far and why?”

There are two ways to read that question, so this should be fun.

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Posted August 24, 2015 by aurorawatcherak in Blog Hop

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New Author Pic   3 comments

Author pic salmonIn case anyone doesn’t believe that I really live this crazy Alaska lifestyle — here’s me with a king salmon. I did not catch this salmon (Brad did), but I have caught ones as big … in a large landing net on a 15-foot-long telescoping pole from a wild Alaska river.

As I am the family photographer, you will usually not see me on camera.

Posted August 22, 2015 by aurorawatcherak in Alaska

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Agony of Criticism   Leave a comment

There are writers and there are authors. Unlike some in the publishing field, I am not convinced that all that separates a writer from becoming an author is publishing a book. I think some unpublished writers are authors in progress while some published writers will never be authors.

It’s a painful truth, but one does not simply sit down and write a good novel. There’s research, there’s writing, there’s rewriting and editing … and more than anything else, there is critique.

How you accept critique is part of what separates writers and authors.

I’ve been scribbling stories since I was 12. I had some critique on my fiction in high school from my teachers, but for most of the decades between then and publishing my first novel I was writing fiction for my own amazement. Then I decided I really wanted to advance a book to publication and I started to submit it to friends to read.

I guess my friends love me. They all said pretty glowing things about the manuscript that would become the seedbed for Daermad Cycle. Somehow I knew that wasn’t completely honest. I went one step further and submitted it to the writers site Authonomy. Mostly I got good reviews and that felt a little bit more honest because these people didn’t know me. Some of the reviewers gave minor critique — moves a bit slowly, takes a long time to get to the point, it’s awfully long — but I wasn’t really sure what to do with that critique.

Then it happened. Somehow I attracted the attention of a notorious misanthrope on the site and he (or that iteration was a she, I think) decided to critique my book.

If you’ve never been run over by a Mac truck, I don’t recommend it.

I knew this was a mean, mean person, but her words bit deep. She (or he) really hated my book. Worse, though a truly miserable human being, this person was also a great writer.

There are three ways to handle that sort of critique:

  • throw the project in the trash bin where the critic suggested … thereby proving that you’re a writer and not an author in progress;
  • ignore the critique and keep the project as it is … also suggesting that you may not be an author in progress;
  • learn from the critique what is worth learning.

The author in progress does the third thing. After I got done being mad and sad in cycles, I resolved to come back to the critique in a while (that turned out to be three months) and mine it for what was worthwhile. Because this person had a history of being deleted from the site, I printed out the critique and put it away for later consumption. In the meantime, more nicer reviews came in that sort of agreed (in a nice way) with the mean review. I recognized that this mean critic had given me solid advice in a truly despicable manner and her critique was really not substantially different from the more soft-soap critique of the nicer reviews. He was brutally honest and that was exactly what I needed.

I went back to the book and applied the critique in a reasonable manner. I broke the manuscript into smaller more manageable portions (thereby creating a series, which is almost never a bad thing in epic fantasy). I was honest about how slow it was and I resolved to change that. I included death and mayhem much earlier than I was comfortable with. I excised the info dumps and limited the beautifully detailed descriptions I like. I added more complex characters, including some actual bad guys. And I got a better book, which got better reviews, but I also gained the confidence to pick a date to publish. You see, buried in that really mean review, was a off-hand statement that I had to mull for a long while and when I came back to it after the rewrite of the book that would become The Willow Branch, Book 1 of the Daermad Cycle, I realized that it was a very subtle compliment. Nasty guy actually thought there was a kernal of something in the book worth saving.

But if I’d done what I thought he was advising — burn the manuscript, eat dirt and die — I never would have come to that realization and either one of two things would have happened. Either The Willow Branch never would have been published or … I shudder to think this — the book entitled that would have been a mediocre book that should not have been published.

One of the major things separating writers from authors in progress is how they handle critique. All critique is useful to those who are willing to use it.

Author Cooperatives   Leave a comment

One of the neat things about social media these days is that a writer can connect with other writers and work together to promote each other’s books.

Currently, I’m working with The Booktrap – a cooperative of Authonomy writers on Facebook and Twitter.

By combining our networks, we can reach far more people about our books, but we can also offer each other advice and support and sometimes humor. Do other writers have something similar?

 

Posted October 8, 2014 by aurorawatcherak in Writing

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Jane Bwye Announces Book Launch   Leave a comment

Jane BwyeMy friend Jane Bwye (Breath of Africa) has announced publication of her new book I Lift Up My Eyes.

Her online launch party is October 7 at 12:00 pm UTC+01, which I have just learned is the designation for Western European Time (I never knew how you wrote it before). You can join the festivities and RSVP at:

https://www.facebook.com/events/284107581774947/298711503647888/?notif_t=plan_mall_activity

Her website is here: http://www.janebwye.com/about-me

Or you could give her some lift on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jbwye

I will be hosting her that day for a brief interview on her new book. Come visit for Writing Wednesday and here all about it.

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