Archive for the ‘alaska gasline’ Tag

Interior gas must be affordable – FDNM   Leave a comment

This Community Perspective does an excellent job of explaining the challenges faced by my local community in a state that is constitutionally obligated to “spread the wealth”, but is dominated by a single city that thinks it should get special treatment. It’s not just Fairbanks that would benefit from a gas line running along the TAPS corridor as opposed to the Railbelt. Approximately half of the non-Anchorage Alaska population would receive a benefit AND the gas could be used for export.

Interior gas must be affordable – Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Community Perspectives.

Exxon goes too far with gas line claim   Leave a comment

Bill Walker, candidate for Alaska governor, provided this community perspective in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner.

Exxon goes too far with gas line claim – Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Community Perspectives.

Bill Walker is my choice for Governor of Alaska!

Gas Line Investment Explained   Leave a comment

Alaska is a weird state in terms of how we do resource development. The Statehood Compact requires that the people of the state not own their subsurface mineral rights. The State of Alaska holds them in trust for us. I doubt the federal government meant to create such a situation, but Alaskan leaders who were out of the box thinkers turned lemons into lemonade when we discovered oil on the North Slope. Alaska went from being the poorest state in the union to being the richest. But no Alaskan citizen owns what is beneath their land.

I’ve used this analogy before. The State of Alaska is like a corporation. Sean Parnell is our current CEO. The Legislature is the board of directors. The citizens are the shareholders.

We’ve tried to 40 years to build a natural gas pipeline from the North Slope to anywhere we could market it. We came the closest we ever had in 2008 when Sarah Palin negotiated AGIA, but things changed and it looked like it wouldn’t be built … again. Alaskans came to the conclusion that the producers were never going to build it … that seems obvious from their behavior and unfulfilled promises over the last 40 years … and so we have decided to join the investment to make it happen.

Yes, I am a small-government advocate and I do not agree with government getting involved in the capitalistic venture … except … I’m sitting on $4 a gallon diesel fuel costs and it takes 1500 gallons to heat my modestly sized home every winter. My electric bill is more than $200 a month IF we sit in the dark a lot and don’t heat water. The EPA is about to shut down wood burning in Interior Alaska, which will drive up that diesel fuel cost. I NEED natural gas and state investment in the gas line is the ONLY way it happens.

So, Bradner’s Report is an instate publication that offers indepth analysis of Alaska issues and they had access to a subject expert on the issue of the gas line. This is the best analysis of the benefits and risks of this project that I have read so far.

AkLegDigest Suppl 5-24-14

Alaska’s LNG Project Legislation Explained   Leave a comment

Alaska’s LNG project legislation explained

Larry Persily

Senate Bill 138, which passed the Alaska Legislature and is expected to receive Gov. Sean Parnell’s signature, provides a framework for the a large LNG project.File art

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article is written for publication by a federal agency whose goal is to transparently coordinate permitting and construction of a pipeline that delivers Alaska’s natural gas to the Lower 48.

Negotiations between the state of Alaska, major North Slope oil and gas producers and pipeline company TransCanada toward a partnership to develop the proposed Alaska LNG project will follow directions approved by state legislators April 20.

The measure, Senate Bill 138, was one of Gov. Sean Parnell’s main legislative initiatives this year. It passed the Senate 16-4 and the House 36-4.

The legislation amends multiple state laws, allowing negotiations to proceed toward the state becoming an equity partner in the multibillion-dollar project — one of the world’s largest liquefied natural gas export plants. Passage was essential for the five-party deal that will govern designing, permitting, building and operating the project.

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20140503/alaskas-lng-project-legislation-explained

 

Posted May 5, 2014 by aurorawatcherak in Alaska

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‘The gas line is coming’   Leave a comment

‘The gas line is coming’: Leaders have touted it before, but Alaskans need to remain optimistic about a project – Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Editorials.

Is it?

It’s been 40 years and we’re still waiting and this is not on the best alignment. It’s “carrying water to the wetlands” rather than to the desert. Anchorage doesn’t need the gas, so what the heck are we doing routed the gas to Anchorage? Fairbanks, Glennallen, Ft. Wainwright and Eielson need the gas and there is a dock in Valdez that could begin exporting as soon as we get federal okay to do so.

But, maybe we’re closer than we’ve ever been to a gasline, even thought this may not provide affordable heating to the Interior, which should be of much greater importance to our legislature than making Anchorage feel like it’s the center of the Alaskan universe.

Forward we go … let’s hope it works out.

Posted April 25, 2014 by aurorawatcherak in Alaska

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Why not use permanent fund to build a gas line? – Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Community Perspectives   Leave a comment

Why not use permanent fund to build a gas line? – Fairbanks Daily News-Miner: Community Perspectives.

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