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Information Rich   10 comments

Inspired by a comment on a recent post.

Discuss: It never fails to amaze me that ALL the books ever written are made up of just twenty six letters.

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Teaching The Alphabet With Visual Sorting | Steps 2 Read

Information Density in Simplistic Form

The English alphabet is made up for just 26 letters that represent 45 sounds and a couple of letters we hardly use at all. Yet, a world of literature fills billions of books with very intricate stories written in myriad ways. How does it work that we can take such a basic system of communication and use it in such complex ways?

That is amazing to consider, but then I remember that the genome encodes billions of genes and can be represented by just four letters.

Consider math. It really consists of 10 symbols – 0-9 — and then repetition and recombination of those 9 symbols to create highly complex numbers.

Computer programing at its base relies on just two symbols – 1 and 0 — similarly combined in complex sequences to encoding information.

Information can be dense without requiring complicated symbolic systems.

Twenty-Six Letters with Myriad Uses

Of course, the 26 letters of the Eurocentric alphabet correlates — sort of — with the 45 sounds we make when we talk. Different languages, however, use the different letters in a myriad of ways. D in English is not pronounced exactly the same way as D in Spanish. If you speak both languages, you have a code-switch to correctly pronounce the words you read. Consider that the Hawaiian language uses just 12 of our letters to convey a lot of information. Their place names, for example, actually mean something. Conversely, Native American languages require extra symbols to stress the various ways speakers intonate the sounds, which can change the meaning of a sentence or a word. Both Athabaskans and Inupiats use far more “q” sounds in their language and while you’ll notice that if you read a page of text, when they speak, you hear a lot of sounds that are deep in the back of the throat, so it’s not really a “q”, but it’s what the translators are left with within the constraints of written English’s 26 letters.

Why Only 26?

English used to have a few other letters in its alphabet and some of them kind of make sense. I used to be a volunteer at our former church’s English & Citizenship school, responsible for teaching thousands of foreign-born folks to speak and read the English language and I can tell you that how English-speakers use the Roman alphabet can be confusing to people who speak other languages … and precision young English-speakers who are trying to learn to read for the first time.

Thorn: þ
This letter — which was pronounced “th” as in “them”. Although we combine t and h to make that sound, my son (who was a very precise human until his teen years) struggled with that combination. He couldn’t understand why the hard T got softened when combined with the “h”. He wanted me or one of his teachers to explain it. He wasn’t happy with the answer of “it just is that way.” Sometime in junior high school, he gave up the question, but when I shared this article with him while I was writing it, he remembered.

“I knew it! English can be so dumb!” He’d like us to start using this symbol immediately.

Wynn: ƿ
The Latin alphabet we use didn’t offer a letter with the “wah” sound popular to English speakers. Wynn filled the void, but not for long. Over time, it became popular to stick two double-“U’s” side-by-side to create the sound of wynn. Think “vacuum” and “continuum”. I don’t find the double-u to not make sense. Also, it looked like a “p” which would be confusing.

Yogh: Ȝ
The yogh sound entered during the Middle English to represent the back-of-the-throat “ch” sound (think: Bach). It disappeared thanks to the French printing presses, which decided to replace yogh with “gh.” It looks like a 3, so that would be confusing, but frankly, I would love to have a letter that represents that sound because “gh” creates guesswork for pronunciation. This is a similar problem to my Inupiat friends who have a similar (but more complex) back-of-the-throat sound that is rendered as a “q”, but isn’t really. Maybe we need another symbol that doesn’t look like a 3, but denotes sounds in the back of our throat. I had a friend in high school whose last name was “Back.” His father was descended from one of Johann Sabastian’s grandsons who migrated to the United States. So of course the question came up how the name morphed. Well, 1st generation Bach didn’t read English and someone had to write his name into the entry book. The name Bach ends with a back of the throat gutteral sound and the clerk probably didn’t know how to spell it, so he wrote it how it sounded — hence “Back”.

Ash: ӕ
You’ve seen it in medieval (when spelled mediaeval) or in aeon and aether. This is an example of Roman ligature, meaning the tying together of two letters, in this case “a” and “e.” Though it was dropped as a letter from English, it remains one in Danish, Norwegian and Icelandic. We do sometimes see words in English spelled with “ae”. This was another reading stumble for my son. Mr. Precision wanted to use the two distinct sounds. He would have loved the single combined letter that told him to blend the sound.

Ethel: œ
Another Latin ligature, this is the combination of “o” and “e” that can be seen in words like “foetus” and “subpoena.” Now in most cases, we replace this letter with an e. It maybe made sense in past times, but today, we doesn’t pronounce the “oe” sound, so it’s not necessary.

Ampersand: &
The ampersand was once considered part of the alphabet. In fact, that’s how it got its name. The end of the alphabet was “x, y, z and, per se, and.” Per se means “in itself, and,” meaning the symbol stands in for “and.” That became am-per-sand.

I think we could add two to four letters to the English alphabet to improve our rendering of how we pronounce some words to a better written equivalent. But the system we have right now works pretty well…most of the time.

Complexity Made Simple

Twenty-six letters to write millions of words filling billions of books. And here we are. We all pretty much understand one another because we have agreed on such a simple system that roughly correlates with how we speak the language. Who came up with it? It’s a product of the brilliance of spontaneous generation tumbled in the hands of millions of people, then polished by William Chester Minor and Daniel Webster who needed to make some decisions on standardization in order to produce the first dictionaries. Eventually we came to what works best for us. It’s possible it will change over time — just as my Inupiat friends have coopted “q” for that throat-clearing raven-clucking sound that characterizes their language. Because as an English-speaker who has tried to learn some of their language, I can attest it’s not a “q” and my Inupiat friends deserve a letter to use for that purpose. My son would vote for symbols for “th” sounds and “ae”.

Time will tell.

Pets & Animals   Leave a comment

PJMacLayne’s blog hop article 5.3.21

Posted May 3, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

Fur & Feathers   Leave a comment

Richard Dee’s blog hop 5.3.21

Posted May 3, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

Sentience   6 comments

Do pets (or other animals) play an important part in your books? Tell us about them.

Joy from Daermad Cycle

Rules:1. Link your blog to this hop.2. Notify your following that you are participating in this blog hop.3. Promise to visit/leave a comment on all participants’ blogs.4. Tweet/or share each person’s blog post. Use #OpenBook when tweeting.5. Put a banner on your blog that you are participating.<!– start InLinkz code –><div class=”inlinkz-widget” data-uuid=”e1e6679373014d03ae3ad227b7eecb71″ style=”width:100%;margin:30px 0;background-color:#eceff1;border-radius:7px;text-align:center;font-size:16px;font-family:’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif”><div style=”padding:8px;”><p style=”margin-bottom:15px;”>You are invited to the <strong>Inlinkz</strong> link party!</p><a href=”https://fresh.inlinkz.com/p/e1e6679373014d03ae3ad227b7eecb71” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow” style=”padding:5px 20px;background:#209cee;text-decoration:none;color:#efefef;border-radius:4px;”>Click here to enter</a></div></div><span style=”display: none;”>http://a%20rel=</span><!– end InLinkz code –>[fresh_inlinkz_code id=”e1e6679373014d03ae3ad227b7eecb71″]https://fresh.inlinkz.com/p/e1e6679373014d03ae3ad227b7eecb71

A Storied History

Growing up, I loved books where animals played a key role. Apparently, the Pokey Little Puppy was my favorite book as toddler. The second book I ever read for myself was My Friend Flicka, which features a horse. By the end of that year, I’d read the entire series which focuses on horses, set on a Wyoming ranch. I spent a lot of evenings with my children reading the Chronicles of Narnia and Watership Down (which my husband and I are now watching on film). In Animal Farm, George Orwell used animals to symbolize well-known humans who were responsible for the tragedy that was the USSR at the time, and gave us a timeless tale of what happens when we overthrow flawed but functional systems without considering the consequences.

Animals play a historic role in literature and in my books.

Meet Joy, Sabre and Hawk

In Daermad Cycle (a high fantasy), psychically gifted people can bond with sentient animals. Padraig bonded to Joy, a beautiful sorrel mare, who has a great sense of humor and frequently challenges her Companion to be better as a sentient being. She provides Padraig with transportation, but she backs him up in battles and has adventures of her own. She can talk to ordinary animals and sometimes gathers intelligence for her human who is tasked with finding the One’s True King.

Joy’s not alone as a sentient animal. Sabre bonded to Ryanna, a half-elven sorceress. Sabre is a dog and, as with Joy, I try to fashion his persona as a dog might think. In the third book, which I am currently writing, Sabre and Ryanna are separated and I’m working on showing the mourning of a dog when its human leaves it.

Other characters in the series have similar bondings and these animals play critical roles in the narrative. And, the Big Bad in the series is a Celtic goddess who has some sort of psychic connection with a raven.

Meet Rocket, Mocha, Glister & Bell

In Transformation Project (day-after-tomorrow apocalyptic), ordinary pets also play important roles in the story. They’re companions, partners, sources of stress relief, occasionally the sacrificial hero. They don’t have the gifts of Companions in the other series, but they are loyal and loving and their humans rely on their fulfilling their part of the partnership. Rocket is one of several horses and the only one I’ve, so far, given a personality. I modeled her after a Mustang that a friend had that was a wild one. Mocha is a chocolate Lab who keeps the Lufgren Farm herds safe. Glister, a yellow Lab (and Mocha’s littermate) lives the life of a pet, but is often companion to members of the Delaney family. Bell the cat appears to fur Shane’s pillow and keep the rodent population down.

Although farm animals generally aren’t given names in the series (in keeping with the farm practices of Midwest American farmers), their existence is often credited with families surviving the winter.

Animals Highlight Our Humanity

The representation of animals in literature has a long and venerable history. Animal characters play defining roles in fables, which are among the oldest narrative genres. Western poetry is replete with animal metaphors and imagery. Even realistic fiction relies on animals to achieve a wide range of rhetorical effects. Disney films, particularly when Walt still influenced the studio, focused largely on anthropomorphized animals. In most cases, animals in western literature reflect human characteristics designed to teach some moral lesson or principles.

Humans struggle to see ourselves reflected in the mirror. It’s hard to see ourselves as we are. More, we struggle to see our heroes and enemies as who they really are. If Orwell had written Animal Farm with human characters, it might well have been ill-received. He understood that there were forces within his own culture who had very skewed views of Trotsky, Lenin and Stalin. He’d have been shouted down for warning against the men the Fabian socialists in charge of his government viewed as heroes. So he allegorized the Russian Revolution where the tsarist autocracy was pushed out and the Bolsheviks came into power, followed by the slow betrayal of the revolution by its supporters under Joseph Stalin. Orwell told a farmyard story, casting revolutionary leaders Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin as pigs who rebel against the tsar-like farmer Mr. Jones. The animals form a cooperative and the pigs exploit them anew, for the pigs’ benefit, not unlike Mr. Jones. When Orwell wrote the book at the end of World War 2, the USSR was being hailed by Allied forces (especially the British) for its decisive victories over Nazi Germany in Stalingrad and Kursk. Orwell’s story seemed insulting of an ally, so publishing houses rejected it. And, yet is was a runaway success when it was finally released and helped lead to the dissolution of wartime alliances that were allowing Stalin to further abuse both the peoples of the USSR and eastern Europe. It is not unlike how the elites of our day try to control public sentiment by what information they sanction and what they allow into the public square, but when information gets past the censors, the public is able to discern truth from fiction.

Despite the characters being animals, Animal Farm reflects humanity in all our messiness, hyperbole, and abusiveness. But the story would never have made it past the publication houses if Orwell had written a more realistic tale.

Similarly, CS Lewis used the animals of Narnia to teach Christian principles to a public that thought (and still thinks) itself to sophisticated to accept the gospel message straight up.

Not Orwell or Lewis

I’m not Orwell or Lewis. I do, however, seek to convey messages within my stories in similar ways. I can admire these writers without trying to emulate them. I’m not a hugely symbolic writer. I’ve never been a fan of literary analysis where people who didn’t write the book try to tell us what archetypes the characters fulfill. I applauded when both Heinlein and Bradbury came out and said the literary analysts had it all wrong about their stories. Does anyone really think the character of Jode (a violent manslaughterer) in Grapes of Wrath was written as an allegory of Jesus Christ? Yeah, we were all taught that in high school lit class, but if you are familiar with Jesus Christ from the Bible, it’s a hard metaphor to swallow. While Steinbeck may have written Jode to fulfill that role, the metaphor hits so far of the model that the analysis ruins reading an otherwise well-written tale.

I avoid symbolic writing for that reason. It’s too easily manipulated by later analysis of people who see everything as archetypes. That doesn’t mean I don’t have messages within my stories. I just prefer to be plain about it. So when I sat down to write Daermad Cycle, knowing that Joy would be a pivotal character, I decided she wouldn’t be symbolic. She’s a real horse and, while I do anthropomorphize her a bit because who really knows what horses think, I chose to make her a character rather than a metaphor.

Animals play critical roles in all of our lives, so of course they should appear in our writing as important characters. While Joy and the sentient animals of Daermad can “speak” to their Companions, ordinary animals in a less speculative setting can still be important family members who enrich a story with their presence.

NVDT #85 – Before and After   Leave a comment

Not Very Deep Thoughts

The Prompt: Prologues and Epilogues. Yes or no?

Part of Open Link Blog Hop

How do I answer that? Key Lime Pie or Lemon Meringue? Tell me sir, have you stopped beating your wife? There is no good answer.

So I figger it’s like them growed up diapers. Depends, don’t it?

Prologues are backstory or in-depth scene setting. Weave backstory into the piece or drop it in when you need it. Unless the prologue is by necessity of length and serves to define some point of “history” or “perspective” for the story. Or as writers, we find ourselves in need of ‘splaining. As my high school Great Books/English/Lit Studies teacher said, “If you must write prologues, study Shakespeare. Shakespeare’s prologues. Not Dryden’s.”

In that light not all prologues are bad. Will had reason enough to set a plain stage with words. Different stories have different set-up and detail requirements.

I…

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Posted April 26, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

Open Book Blog Hop – 26th April   1 comment

Stevie Turner

Welcome to this week’s blog hop. Today the topic is:

‘Prologues and Epilogues. Yes or no?’

I do sometimes use prologues and epilogues, and so my choice would be to say yes. The prologue might give a small slice of the plot/action to come, introduce the reader to the main character(s), or maybe it might have a little bit of backstory. At the end of the story the epilogue ties all the loose ends up nicely.

However, I have since read differing opinions in that prologues and epilogues are old-fashioned and should preferably be left out. As usual I think it’s up to the author whether or not they put them in. Some of my novels have them and others do not. Below I’ll add the prologue I wrote for ‘A House Without Windows‘ back in 2014. People seem to like it, as it has 103 ratings…

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Posted April 26, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

Prologue/Epilogue – Yes or No?   Leave a comment

PJ MacLayne’s Blog Article

Posted April 26, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

The bits at the ends, prologues and epilogues   Leave a comment

Richard Dee’s Blog Post

Posted April 26, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Uncategorized

Before & After   11 comments

Prologues and Epilogues. Yes or no?

Rules:1. Link your blog to this hop.2. Notify your following that you are participating in this blog hop.3. Promise to visit/leave a comment on all participants’ blogs.4. Tweet/or share each person’s blog post. Use #OpenBook when tweeting.5. Put a banner on your blog that you are participating.<!– start InLinkz code –><div class=”inlinkz-widget” data-uuid=”03e00155e1864ee4a06fd8cb0c4b17a4″ style=”width:100%;margin:30px 0;background-color:#eceff1;border-radius:7px;text-align:center;font-size:16px;font-family:’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif”><div style=”padding:8px;”><p style=”margin-bottom:15px;”>You are invited to the <strong>Inlinkz</strong> link party!</p><a href=”https://fresh.inlinkz.com/p/03e00155e1864ee4a06fd8cb0c4b17a4” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow” style=”padding:5px 20px;background:#209cee;text-decoration:none;color:#efefef;border-radius:4px;”>Click here to enter</a></div></div><span style=”display: none;”>http://a%20rel=</span><!– end InLinkz code –>[fresh_inlinkz_code id=”03e00155e1864ee4a06fd8cb0c4b17a4″]https://fresh.inlinkz.com/p/03e00155e1864ee4a06fd8cb0c4b17a4

Depends on the Story

You can surf around the net and run across writer advice articles that say don’t do prologues and epilogues and then you can find articles that say prologues and epilogues done well are great writer techniques. There’s controversy and some people take their stances very seriously.

I think the story should dictate the use.

The Beginning

A prologue gives readers extra information that advances the plot. Some prologues give background information about the story — such as a sci-fi or fantasy book that includes a useful description of the alien world. Think Lord of the Rings or Dune. Others grab readers attention with a exciting scene from the middle of the story or an important event in the past that drives the action of the novel.

I use a short prologue in the beginning of each of the books in Transformation Project. They’re not wholly necessary, but they started because one of my beta readers suggested it in the second book Objects in View. He felt there needed to be a connection with the first book. I didn’t want to do a synopsis of the previous book and I didn’t like putting a lot of reminders of previous events in the second book. I’d recently read a really well-written series where the writer wasted a lot of ink on reminding readers what had happened in the book they just read. I didn’t want to roll my eyes at those explanatory paragraphs in my own books.

So instead, I created a memoir written by JT Delaney looking back at the present times. I write the novels in 3rd person, but I write the prologue in 1st person. It’s an excerpt from another book the reader has yet to see — a person looking back on history and how they felt or the events that touched them most personally. At some point, my characters will leave their small Kansas town and JT Delaney is going to offer observation on the larger world.

Having created a prologue to solve a problem in Objects in View, the character of JT Delaney continued to write the memoir and, as I’ve said before, my characters dictate the story. I know who this character is. I’ve had people ask me and I’m not telling. Guess and you might get something for a correct answer.

The prologue is not wholly necessary, but I think it’s a nice touch. It says someone survives the end of life as they knew it and at least one member of the Delaney family will go forward — but who. Maybe I’ll tell in the last book in the series.

I haven’t written prologues for any of my other books and I don’t know that I will — unless — well, there’s a time jump in Daermad Cycle that might need a prologue in a later book. I don’t think prologues are necessary, but they can serve a useful purpose under some circumstances.

A couple of things I keep in mind. A prologue should be interesting. It should focus on the important information. It should be short. You don’t want the prologue to eat the main story. The language and tone must work with the main story or, in the case of my prologues in Transformation Project, I focus on keeping the style consistent with the memoirist. It’s the same person in every book, so it should sound like the same person writing.

Don’t use the prologue for a massive information dump. I love Tolkien’s writing, but I must have started The Hobbit 15 times before I could get through the info dump it starts with. For the same reason, I only read The Lord of the Rings after I saw the first movie. The prologue didn’t bother me once I saw the movie and when I decided to reread it this winter, I just skipped the prologue. Your prologue shouldn’t glaze the eyes of your readers. Which is why mine are short and don’t include a lot of information.

The opening pages of a novel are critical moments when you grab the reader’s attention. Because I usually end the books in Transformation Project with a cliff hanger, I don’t want to keep readers guessing for too long. I want to resolve the cliff-hanger quickly. Readers will put up with a one-page prologue, but I don’t ask them to stick it out for longer than that. My goal in the prologue is to hint at something in the later story that will make them want to continue after I’ve resolved the cliff-hanger. JT Delaney is a historian who knows what happened. Follow the bread-crumbs to the next event.

In other authors’ writing sometimes a prologue is a waste of ink and sometimes it’s a major hook. In JM Darhower’s Ghosted, the story starts with a prologue. A man standing in the rain outside a house where a wake is taking place, confronted by a woman who tells him to go away. She can tell he doesn’t want to and she can also tell he’s wasted. He goes and then you see a little girl coming to her mommy. Well, you can guess the future story in this visceral scene. It’s a romance so you know something is going to draw the father and mother of this little girl together, and you’re left with all these questions of how or when or if it’s even possible. And it doesn’t really answer any of those questions, so that it forces the reader to find out what happens next. It’s great because you read it in the preview of the novel and you have to buy the book to find out the answers.

The End

Authors as far back as Homer and as recently as Harry Potter have used epilogues to follow up on characters after the dramatic climax of the story. In a romance the epilogue may show the two protagonists living happily ever after. A thriller epilogue may show the protagonist healing from devastating mortal wounds and uniting with a love interest.

I hope I’m writing great stories that help my readers emotionally connect with my characters so they want to know what happens to them in the future. An epilogue shows the emotional impact the story’s events have on the characters after the excitement dies down. Think about the last chapter of The Hunger Games series. Kattniss and Peeta are raising their children and Kat is looking back on the events that got them there. It’s bitter-sweet and you learn a lot about the events of their world since the revolution. I wanted to know that information and it helped me to lay the characters to rest, knowing that they were okay, though scarred by their experiences.

I never really thought of my teaser chapters from the next book in the series as epilogues, but researching for this blog post revealed that that’s what they’re classed as. I’ve already created a cliff-hanger when I ended the main body of the work. Some character’s future existence is in jeopardy. Readers who started Life As We Knew It with Shane’s gun in his mouth should expect that I might kill any character in the series at any moment. So, I don’t need to make my teaser epilogue into a cliff-hanger. I do want readers to know that the next book will be as exciting as the book before it. Yes, buy the next book. You won’t be disappointed. The story is continuing, there may be a twist coming, prepare for a change. I try to remember as I’m writing the main story that something in the next book must draw the reader onward. The series epilogue is not a tacked-on piece of concluding evidence–it’s a clue that creates a desire to read the next book. And, by the way, it is rarely the first scene in the next book and it never resolves the cliff hanger of the book it is in. Doing that would just defeat the whole purpose.

Now, when a story is over, it should be over. Not every story needs an epilogue. Readers wanted to know Kattniss’s ultimate choice for spouse and how her life worked out, but other stories don’t need that. One of the greatest disappointments for me in reading the Deverry Cycle was the ending epilogue of the series. I didn’t really need to know how everybody turned out how many years after the ending of the action. There was no need to tie up every single thread. I prefer my imagination to how Katharine Kerr, an otherwise phenomenal author, tied everything up. Sometimes there’s satisfaction in an epilogue and sometimes it’s just plain anti-climatic. I suspect it’s hard to conclude a series you’ve been working on for 20 years, but I was left bored by the way she chose to do it.

One of my favorite examples of an epilogue that works is from Laura Kinsale’s Flowers From the Storm. There’s a little bit of a time jump from the ending of the story — when the main female character decides she can remain married to the alpha male who has significant communications problems from a brain injury. The scene shows their marriage working, their friends doing well, it remarks on what the female character is doing and on the successes of her husband in overcoming his disability. It shows that he’s not healed, but coping and she accepts him as he is. And then it hints that she’s about to get pregnant — and does it in a deliciously fun way that harkens back to an earlier scene in the book. The reader is left satisfied that the characters are in a good place in their lives and with a little imagination, they can imagine them raising children together and living happily ever after.

It’s What the Story Needs

Not every story needs a prologue or an epilogue. Some need one and not the other. Every story is different and good novelists understand that. Our goal should always be to give the reader what they need to make the story as rich for them as we imagine it in our heads. While there might be controversy about prologues and epilogues, excellence should always be in style.

Posted April 26, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Blog Hop

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Describing It   3 comments

Let’s talk about book descriptions. Do you write yours before or after you write the story?

Rules:1. Link your blog to this hop.2. Notify your following that you are participating in this blog hop.3. Promise to visit/leave a comment on all participants’ blogs.4. Tweet/or share each person’s blog post. Use #OpenBook when tweeting.5. Put a banner on your blog that you are participating.<!– start InLinkz code –><div class=”inlinkz-widget” data-uuid=”37aed1931a2e4706a3a3a04550684a4f” style=”width:100%;margin:30px 0;background-color:#eceff1;border-radius:7px;text-align:center;font-size:16px;font-family:’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif”><div style=”padding:8px;”><p style=”margin-bottom:15px;”>You are invited to the <strong>Inlinkz</strong> link party!</p><a href=”https://fresh.inlinkz.com/p/37aed1931a2e4706a3a3a04550684a4f” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow” style=”padding:5px 20px;background:#209cee;text-decoration:none;color:#efefef;border-radius:4px;”>Click here to enter</a></div></div><span style=”display: none;”><script async=”true” src=”https://fresh.inlinkz.com/js/widget/load.js…“></script></span><!– end InLinkz code –>[fresh_inlinkz_code id=”37aed1931a2e4706a3a3a04550684a4f”]https://fresh.inlinkz.com/p/37aed1931a2e4706a3a3a04550684a4f

How to Write a Good Book Description

Where Does My Cart Go?

I write my book description after I write the story. Why? Because I’m a discovery writer, so I don’t necessarily know what the best part of a story will be before I write it. That is revealed by my creative process.

I do have a basic goal in mind when I’m writing my series – “This book will focus on these events.” It’s how I can come up with a title for the next book and even sometimes a cover before the story is written. I know something will definitely occur in the next segment. But, sometimes, in the process of writing, a mundane event will become something special and so …

The book description is definitely a part of post-production.

Posted April 20, 2021 by aurorawatcherak in Blog Hop

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