Fantasy & Philosophy   8 comments

What are the best two or three books you’ve read this year?

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Books to Enjoy & Enlighten

My fiction choice is fat fantasies, which take a long time to read. So it might not be too surprising that the best book I’ve read this year is –

Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive by [Sanderson, Brandon]

Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson

It’s Book 3 in the Stormlight Archives, focused on a land of humans faced by invasion from a group of non-humans. The series has a sweeping scope and a vast land that is very different from what we know on Earth and an ensemble cast of characters. Although the first two books were fascinating, the third book really starts to delve into an amazing series of philosophical questions. And for a political philosophy junkie like me, the fact that a couple of main characters are trying to create a new government is intriguing.

The second best book I’m reading is –

Conceived in Liberty by Murray Rothbard

It is the history of the America colonies from before the first colonists left Europe to the American Revolution. It’s a massive book – actually a series and I’ve been working my way through it for more than two years now. It’s amazing because it focuses not so much on events as on the philosophy (liberty) that motivated the events. Time and time again, Rothbard showed how one faction was striving for individual liberty and another was seeking to tyrannize individual choices.

I’m reading a couple of other non-fiction books, but mostly I’ve been reading libertarian essays by the great luminaries of the philosophy because in my book series Transformation Project, my people are about to create a new society for themselves and I’m trying to figure out how they’ll do that.

I know, some weighty topics there, but you have to research to write a good novel with a political-philosophical basis.

I reread Silent Spring by Rachel Carson and Bratt Farrar by Josephine Tey also.

I’m also rereading The Dragonbone Chair by Tad Williams because I felt I should brush up on the old Memory, Sorrow and Thorn (Osten Ard) series before I read the new series starting with Kingdom of Grass.

There are so many books I’d like to read, but I only have so much time and I’m writing a novel series. Maybe next year I’ll be able to read more for pleasure and less for intellectual stimulation. We’ll see.

Posted September 9, 2019 by aurorawatcherak in Blog Hop

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8 responses to “Fantasy & Philosophy

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  1. Wow, that must be a fat book indeed if you’re still reading it after 2 years! Well done for persevering …

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    • It’s not exactly a book. If you buy it in hardback, it takes up a bookshelf – 10 volumns, I think. Rothbard is a more interesting history writer than some other historians, but I really wish historians in general would hire ghost-writers. They all suffer from the same writer ailment – info dump versus entertainment. They could make history so much more compelling, but they are too focused on the facts over presentation of the facs.

      Consequently, I’m good for one chapter about monthly and then I have to go do something else that doesn’t make my eyes dry out.

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  2. Conceived in Liberty sounds fascinating- until you explain how hard it is to read! 🙂

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  3. I keep hearing great things about Sanderson, but the first book I tried failed. I don’t know that it was the author, though. I was listening to it while I painted, and I was new to audiobooks at that point. It just didn’t get anywhere for me, but I’m going to try again someday with a different book.

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    • I don’t like all of his books and I have audio book ADD, so I can’t listen to books on tape and enjoy them. My mind wanders, which is not a problem when I read. Probably proof that I’m a visual learner.

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