It’s Not Freedom If You Can’t Exercise It, Pt 1   Leave a comment

I’m a writer. Well, if you read this blog, you know that. I write a lot of non-fiction and I’ve published several novels. Writing is what I do.

I don’t write “Christian” books, but I am a Christian who writes. My faith works its way into my writing whether I mean it to or not because my faith is a part of me on a deep fundamental level. It doesn’t just dictate my surface actions on Sundays, but all of my actions, even the unthinking nouns and conjunctions.

From the moment I heard about Jack Phillips, I understood what he was going through. He was asked by a gay couple to make a custom wedding cake. Phillips explained that he would gladly make them cupcakes or cookies, but his faith teaches him that marriage is between a man and a woman and he could not participate in their wedding by making a cake that celebrated what the Bible teaches is sin.

I used to provide wedding photography as a ministry. If you couldn’t afford it or it involved hiking up a middling-sized Alaska mountain, I was up for it. People usually just reimbursed me for the film, processing, and printing. I stopped not long after I did a friend’s rock-climbing birthday. My friend is a lesbian and I had no problem celebrating her birthday. But she showed those photos to another lesbian we worked with and that woman asked me if I’d do her wedding. Fortunately, the wedding was in Hawaii so I could plead the cost. When I asked a lawyer about it, he said “You’re playing with fire. The day will come when someone is going to require you to violate your beliefs … do it for free … and take you to court if you refuse.” I let it be known that I was too busy with my writing to do photography for anyone not an official member of my church. True, but not so much that I wouldn’t have found the time for someone who needed it.

It is impossible to take pictures at a wedding or bake the cake and not be seen by others as approving that wedding. And whether you like it or not, the Bible is clear that homosexual activity is not something Christians can participate in. 1 Corinthians tells us to “Flee sexual immorality”, not put a nice set of clothes and attend a celebration to sanctify it.

Related imageThe jury is still out. Photography might be considered a passive recording of the event rather than an artistic expression. When I heard Phillips argument before the Supreme Court, I thought seriously about what would I do if someone came along and forced me to write something I truly knew would violate my beliefs.

Because I am both a non-fiction and fictional writer, I am somewhat like Jack Phllips. Sometimes I’m creating generic content for the masses and sometimes I creating a highly artistic enterprise. I would never say gay people can’t or shouldn’t buy my books. I suspect gay people have read my newspaper and magazine articles and blog posts. But what if one of my lesbian acquaintances came to me and wanted to hire me to write a narrative for her wedding? About 30 years ago, I actually did that for a couple who asked me to. I haven’t done it since, but I haven’t advertised that I would do that sort of thing. So, what would I do?

I wouldn’t decline the Christian couple who asked. I might not decline the non-Christian couple, although they might not like what I write. I would be very circumspect about doing that sort of service for a Christian couple where one or more of them were divorced from a prior spouse. It would depend on the circumstances. I would deny a Christian marrying a non-Christian because I think that is a Scriptural example of sexual immorality. And, I would decline a homosexual couple for the same reason. I should go see if my legal insurance is paid up. I just might need it.

The Supreme Court of the United States ruled this week that the Colorado Human Rights Commission discriminating against Jack Phillips because it was blatantly hostile to his faith, considered it be “despicable” and “merely rhetorical and [sic] insincere”, comparing the invocation of his sincerely held religious beliefs to defenses of slavery and the Holocaust. Such a sentiment “is inappropriate for a Commission charged with the solemn responsibility of fair and neutral enforcement of … a law that protects discrimination on the basis of religion as well as sexual orientation.”  Because no subsequent attempt was made to disavow those statements, Justice Kennedy concluded that “the Court cannot avoid the conclusion that these statements cast doubt on the fairness and impartiality of the Commissioner’s adjudication of Phillips’ case.”

Kennedy also noted that the Civil Rights Division had considered the refusal of other bakers to create cakes with images that conveyed disapproval of same-sex marriage, along with religious text and “found that the baker acted lawfully in refusing service.” The treatment of the conscience-based refusals in these other three cases with the Commission’s treatment of Phillips’ object was built on a presupposition that any message on the wedding cake would be attributed to the customers rather than the baker, but the Division never actually addressed that issue in its findings. One of the salient points for the Colorado Commission was that the bakeries were willing to sell other items to the customers, but then they dismissed as irrelevant Phillips’ willingness to sell “birthday cakes, shower cakes, cookies and brownies” to gay and lesbian couples. The Commission had treated the other bakers’ conscience-based objects as legitimate, but treated his as illegitimate, thus judging the validity of his religious beliefs themselves … deeming his beliefs to be offensive.

“The Commission was obliged under the Free Exercise Clause to proceed in a manner neutral toward and tolerant of Phillips’ religious beliefs. The Constitution ‘commits government itself to religious tolerance, and upon even slight suspicion that proposals for state intervention stem from animosity to religion or distrust of its practices, all officials must pause to remember their own high duty to the Constitution and to the rights it secures'” (citing Church of Lukumi Babalu Aye).

Kennedy, writing the majority opinion found the Commission’s hostility to Phillips’ beliefs “inconsistent with the First Amendment’s guarantee that our laws be applied in a manner that is neutral toward religion.”

The SCOTUS left open the door for “cases of other circumstances” to further elaborate these arguments in the courts, reminding those future courts that “these disputes must be resolved with tolerance, without undue disrespect to sincere religious beliefs, and without subjecting gay persons to indignities when they seek goods and services in an open market.”

Contrary to popular media depiction, this was not a “narrow” decision. When fewer than a third of the justices dissented from the majority opening, it isn’t a narrow decision. 7 to 2 is practically a repudiation … especially when you consider that Elena Kagan — not exactly a conservative or constructionist juror — concurred with the majority.

 

More on that in my next post

Part 2

Advertisements

What's Your Opinion?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Ask A Libertarian

This page is represented by libertarians to spread awareness of libertarianism and empower libertarians while informing non-libertarians.

Blessed with a Star on the Forehead

As I navigate through this life ...

Lyndell Williams

Author * Writer * Stoker of Flames

FAIRBANKS ARTS ASSOCIATION

Promoting traditional and contemporary arts in Interior Alaska since 1966

Joanne's Bargains

Bargains From Around The Web

Leadingchurch.com

Gospel Word Gardening in the Age of Decay

Jodie's Sewing Studio

Sewing Should be Fun

Webinar Starter Blueprint

The place to learn about doing webinars

Professor Eric Dent's Blog

A Scholar's View of the World

The Author Lab

A writing collective

The BookNook UK

You can find magic wherever you look. Sit back and relax, all you need is a book - Dr. Seuss

Unlearning Economics

Musings on the Current State of Economics

Reveries

a state of being pleasantly lost in one's thoughts; a daydream

Christian Creative Nexus

Spiritual Resourcing Hub for Christians Pursuing their Calling

campogeno

die welt aus der sicht eines einsiedlers

Becoming Christians

Every Christian's Journey Toward Eternity...

%d bloggers like this: