Archive for November 2017

Concealed Carry Works 1   Leave a comment

From 2016

https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/uber-driver-shoots-man-who-allegedly-fired-at-group-on-logan-square-sidewalk/

An Uber driver put his concealed carry permit to use Friday night when he pulled a gun and opened fire on a man he saw firing a pistol into a group of people on a Logan Square sidewalk, according to prosecutors.

Six blasts from his gun injured a 22-year-old man identified as Everardo Custodio.

Custodio suffered wounds to his shin, knee and lower back and was still in Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center on Sunday, when Cook County Judge Peggy Chiampas refused to grant bail on charges of aggravated battery with a firearm and illegal possession of a firearm.

The 47-year-old Uber driver “was acting in self-defense and in the defense of others,” Assistant State’s Attorney Barry Quinn said.

Custodio, who lives about a block from the site of the shooting, was the only person injured in the confrontation that happened about 11:50 p.m. in the 2900 block of North Milwaukee Avenue.

The Uber driver had dropped off a passenger minutes before the shooting occurred, said Uber spokeswoman Jen Mullin. She had no comment on the driver’s actions other than to say the company requires all its drivers to abide by local, state and federal laws pertaining to transporting firearms in vehicles.

Quinn said the Uber driver, who could not be reached Sunday, was parked in his car when Custodio began firing in his direction, aiming at the nearby group of people.

Police patrolling the area heard the shots and arrived to find Custodio on the ground and bleeding. Police also recovered a handgun found near Custodio, Quinn said.

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The Uber driver, who’s from the Near South Side, stayed on the scene and provided documentation of gun ownership to police. He’s a registered gun owner who has a concealed carry license. He doesn’t face any charges.

Uber plans to interview the driver and the passenger he dropped off before the shooting, said Mullin, who did not know where the driver stowed his gun.

The driver was still an active driver for Uber as of Sunday night, Mullin said.

 

Where the Guns Are & Murders Are Not   Leave a comment

This is the problem in a nutshell. If you look at this map, you see where the guns are. My community of the Fairbanks North Star Borough has the second-highest density of guns per population. We’ve never had a mass shooting and you can see from the second map that we score really low on the murders per capita scale compared to larger cities.

These two maps are almost in contrast to one another. It appears there is no correlation between access to guns and gun homicides when you look at the actual numbers.

Posted November 16, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in Common sense, Uncategorized

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Murder Rate by US County   Leave a comment

What’s going on here? Why would the murder rate be so high in some areas of the country, but not others?

Oddly, most of the dark red zones are cities and the darkest zones are the cities where guns have been banned or highly restricted.

It would seem we have two Americas – the one where lots of people own lots of guns, but don’t generally murder one another and the other where few people own any guns, but killing one another happens often.

It’s an interesting dichotomy where the result appears to be the exact opposite of what is intended.

Deck the Halls!   4 comments

Ah, Christmas! The Thanksgiving to New Year’s Eve season is bright shiny lights, twinkling tinsel, parties and feasts and gift buying galore.

When our children were little we had Thanksgiving, followed by an anniversary, St. Lucia’s Day, two birthdays, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve, and New Year’s Day. One year, I counted 27 different celebratory get-togethers that one or more of the family attended.

Nuts, right?

Image result for image of autumn inspired christmas decorationsSo  how did we de-lunacize our holiday experience?

November 13, 2017 – As the holidays begin rolling in, what do you do to prepare your house, yourself and your family for the hectic days ahead?

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Something had to give and it started giving that year.

I now buy Christmas gifts in September or even earlier. I avoid Black Friday altogether and, right there, take a lot of stress out of my life.

My favorite season is autumn, so I decorate my house for the season with autumnal colors – leaf swags, floral arrangements, a basket of fake gourds, the emergency lanterns that have a practical artistry. From Labor Day through Thanksgiving, our house is a veritable fall scene — and it will be again after New Years.

I make a huge meal for Thanksgiving and on the Friday, we swap out the autumn decorations for Christmas decor while eating leftovers. We put up and decorate the natural-look fake tree (don’t laugh, they don’t burn your house down so easily). We swap the swags, wreaths and floral arrangements and I pose my St. Nicholas figurine collection on the radiator shelf under the front window. A former supervisor used to give me one of these every Christmas and so I have a historical retrospective of St. Nicholas’ evolution from Turkish monk struggling through snows with a backpack to  a jolly Santa delivering a sleigh full of toys. We also put out a Nativity scene. Our 18-year-old son is going on 15 years of picking where the Wise Men start their journey (they weren’t at the stable there when Jesus was born). They’ll move closer as Christmas approaches and reach their final destination on Boxing Day (December 26 for Americans). We’ll take the decorations down New Years Day.

We really don’t do much with the outside of the house because Fairbanks has true winter and it’s usually been deep winter for a month by Thanksgiving. Before our crab apple tree got so large, Brad would throw a light-net over it, but about three years ago, the tree suddenly got too tall to do that without a huge ladder, so we agreed to stop. We’ve talked about doing a plywood cutout Nativity scene, but we haven’t planned it yet.

Saturday after Thanksgiving, I’ll pull everything out of the fridge so I can clean the thing top to bottom. Brad will scrub the counter and clean up the broiler pans and other serving items to be ready for Christmas. And, then … nowadays, we sort of relax.  We still have the anniversary and two birthdays but the kids do their own planning now and we don’t sweat it. Maybe we’ll go to a Christmas party or the local production of the Nutcracker. We might participate in our church’s pageant. They’re always looking for narrators and last year, I helped with writing the narrative.

My brother will probably come over for Christmas Eve. Our mother was born on Christmas Day, so we have traditionally celebrated Christmas on Christmas Eve since as far back as I can remember. If he comes to our house, we’ll eat leftovers for Christmas Day. If we go to his house, I’ll make Christmas dinner. But, as with Thanksgiving, I don’t really sweat the meal. Turkeys are easy and I was raised in a restaurant. My parents taught me all sorts of cool tricks for making a big meal come out all at the same time without stressing myself out. Christmas Day is a time of relaxation and introspection for us … a spiritually focused day.

Mainly, how we prepare ourselves for the season is by reminding ourselves that we don’t have to get sucked into all the insanity of high expectations and frenetic activity. We concentrate on home and hearth and we have pared down activities to only those needed for the family or church.

 

Posted November 13, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in Blog Hop, Uncategorized

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2 Corinthians Introduction   Leave a comment

I’m turning my attention to 2 Corinthians because the two letters really are joined at the hip in many ways. The apostle Paul wrote this letter. How do we know?

Image result for image of second corinthiansIn general, the external and internal evidence for Pauline authorship of 2 Corinthians are the same as for 1 Corinthians. There are three bits of evidence for this to consider.

  1. The external evidence is quite strong for 2 Corinthians, though not as strong as for 1 Corinthians. Scholars use quotations by the early Church Fathers as evidence that the book was of 1st century origins. 2 Corinthians is not quoted by Clement, but it is quoted by Polycarp, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, and Tertullian. Further, it is listed in Marcion’s Apostolicon and the Muratorian Canon.
  2. Internally, using 1 Corinthians as a benchmark of authenticity, this epistle easily passes the test. The literary style and form of argumentation are the same.
  3. There is another significant piece of internal evidence which, though present in traces in 1 Corinthians, is much stronger in 2 Corinthians. A pious imitator would be unlikely to portray Paul as an apostle in danger of losing his authority at Corinth or an apostle struggling to preserve the Corinthians from apostasy.”

It may be helpful here to rehearse the contacts and correspondence between Paul and the Corinthians.

  • Spring 50 AD, Paul arrived in Corinth and stayed there one and one-half years (Acts 18:11), in the home of Priscilla and Aquila.
  • Fall of 51 AD Paul sailed for Ephesus with Priscilla and Aquila. Priscilla and Aquila stayed in Ephesus while Paul returned to Antioch (Acts 18:18-22). While in Ephesus, Aquila and Priscilla met and trained Apollos, sending him back to Corinth to minister in Paul’s absence (Acts 18:24–19:1).
  • Summer/fall of 52 AD, Paul returned to Ephesus (after passing through the Phrygian-Galatian region) on his third missionary journey, and ministered there almost three years (Acts 20:31). Probably in the first year of his ministry in Ephesus, Paul wrote a letter to the Corinthians—a letter which is now lost (see 1 Corinthians 5:9).
  • Probably in the spring of 54 AD, Paul learned of other problems in Corinth from Chloe (1 Cor 1:11) and the delegation of Stephanas, Fortunatus and Achaicus (1 Cor 16:17). He then wrote the letter we call 1 Corinthians. He was in the second year of his ministry at Ephesus.
  • In the summer/fall of AD 54, he visited Corinth as he had indicated he would in 1 Corinthians 16:6, but he was not able to spend the winter with them. It’s possible Timothy had warned him the Corinthians hadn’t taken kindly to his rebukes in 1 Corinthians. What was originally planned as a positive time ended up being Paul’s “painful visit” (2 Cor 2:1) because of a particular man who was acting immorally (2:5-11; 7:12)—and was, indeed, creating doubts among the congregation about Paul’s apostolic authority. It was also painful because it was done in haste (he went directly to Corinth, bypassing Macedonia) and was much shorter than planned.
  • After the painful visit, Paul returned to Ephesus (Fall 54). Because of his humiliation at Corinth, Paul wrote a “severe letter” (2 Cor 2:3-4; 7:8), which was apparently carried by Titus (2 Cor 7:5-8). Scholars tentatively suggest a date of spring 55 for this severe letter
  • Paul left Ephesus in the spring of 55 AD for Macedonia, probably Philippi (Acts 20:1). On the way he stopped at Troas, intending to meet Titus there on his way back from Corinth. But he could not find Titus and sailed for Macedonia without him (2 Cor 2:12-13), hoping to meet him there.
  • Paul met Titus in Macedonia, learned from him that the Corinthians are getting straightened out (2 Cor 7:6-16), and while in Macedonia he wrote 2 Corinthians. Most likely, it was written in the fall of 55 AD.
  • Finally, in the winter of 55-56 AD Paul again visited the Corinthians (Acts 20:32 Cor 12:14).

If this reconstruction is correct, Paul visited Corinth three times and wrote four letters to the Corinthians, the second and fourth of which have been preserved.

There’s all kinds of different theories as to why the first and third letters no longer exist. There are some scholars who so fear that people will come to question the inspirational nature of scripture that they must twist themselves into pretzels to find some parts of these missing letters in either of the two existing letters. I’m more practical than that.  I think, and scholars at Dallas Theological Seminary appear to agree with me, that the harsher of the four letters weren’t circulated or copied and so, disappeared into the dustbin of history. Rebukes are painful and when a church has no intentions of adjusting to discipline, neglect of correspondence happens.

Nowhere in the Bible is there a claim that inspiration will protect a letter from loss. What we are promised is that what we have preserved now is God’s word. We know from the ending of John, that much more of Jesus’ words could have been recorded, but it would be too much and so, it wasn’t.

Paul began his second (canonical) letter to the Corinthians with a customary greeting (1:1-2), followed by a customary thanksgiving (1:3-11). But the thanksgiving this time is not for the church’s progress in the faith (as is usual in Paul’s salutations), but for God’s comfort of him in the midst of great hardships (1:3-11).

This note on God’s comfort in affliction is a natural bridge to the body of the epistle, for 2 Corinthians is focused on God’s glory in the midst of suffering. There are three main sections to this epistle:

  • defense of Paul’s apostleship in the light of his critics’ charges (1:12–7:16)
  • exhortation of the Corinthians to give to the collection for the poor believers in Jerusalem (8:1–9:15)
  • final affirmation of Paul’s apostolic authority (10:1–13:10).

Posted November 12, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in Christianity

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Regulatory Reducing Diet   Leave a comment

The last Western Union telegram was sent 11 years ago. Why? Because technology outstripped its usefulness a long time ago. But the FCC recently decided to end burdensome regulations that stifled telegraph technology. As Reuters reported:

 

AT&T Inc, originally known as the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, in 2013 lamented the FCC’s failure to formally stop enforcing some telegraph rules.

‘Regulations have a tendency to persist long after they outlived any usefulness and it takes real focus and effort to ultimately remove them from the books even when everyone agrees that it is the common sense thing to do,’ the company said.”

Related image

Regulations are far easier to create than they are to dismantle, yet there has been an undeniable trend of repealing these types of regulations lately. We haven’t seen anything like it since the Reagan administration. Who is responsible for this housecleaning? None other than President Donald Trump.

 

Ronald Reagan left many legacies during his duration in the White House. I could grumble out his contribution to the War on Drugs, but I’m going to focus on his deregulatory accomplishments.  During the Reagan administration, both the Federal Register and federal regulations decreased by more than one-third. That’s a pretty impressive record, considering most presidents increase regulation, but Donald Trump has already shattered that record.

Yes, he’s been in office less than a year and has already accomplished more on this front than Reagan did in eight years. Upon taking office, Donald Trump signed an executive order telling federal agencies that they must cut two existing regulations for each new regulation proposed. Contained within this executive order was the demand that each federal agency create a task force with the explicit purpose of finding regulations worth slashing. This act was intended to help the newly sworn-in president reach his promise of cutting 70% of all federal regulations.

Regulatory cuts are typical GOP rhetoric, but the left immediately set about to fight this executive order. A coalition of left-leaning organizations even joined together in February to sue Trump on the grounds that his executive order would potentially “block or force the repeal of regulations needed to protect health, safety, and the environment, across a broad range of topics – from automobile safety, to occupational health, to air pollution, to endangered species.”

Trump doesn’t scare easily. He’s an old hand at lawsuits. He’s continued forward with his objective.

The score speaks for itself. During the same point of time of their respective presidencies, Obama’s regulatory tally was at 1,737 while Trump’s is 1,241. And while Reagan’s own regulatory cuts were admirable, they still don’t compare with Trump’s if you judge them by the same time frame.

Earlier this October, Trump announced his plans to further cut taxes along with red tape that negatively impacts both businesses and consumers. According to CEI, the current level of federal regulatory burdens have amounted to nearly $2 trillion. Business owners pay the initial costs, but regulatory burden inevitably trickles down to the consumer. When overhead costs are raised on entrepreneurs, the cost must be made up somewhere. These hidden costs account for about $15,000 per household in any given year.

As the 2017 fiscal year came to a close this month, the White House also released its initiative to cut more red tape to jump start the economy. Obviously, the “do nothing” method is a far cry from Obama’s overbearing regulatory intervention. This is pleasing Trump supporters, the business sector and economics geeks like me who are fed up with a decade of economic stagnation, but recognize that Congress has yet to act on any substantial reform in either the House or the Senate. This is all being done by executive order. Regulations, by the way, are the one area where Presidents may act without the advise and consent of Congress. Regulations are an Executive Branch function.

The White House has continued its efforts to encourage regulatory relief by pushing for three specific reform efforts, listed by CEI’s Clyde Wayne Crews as follows:

  1. Trump’s January executive order requiring agencies to eliminate at least two rules for every new regulation adopted, and that they ensure net new regulatory costs of zero;
  2. A sweeping  Reorganization Executive Order that requires the Office of Management and Budget to submit a plan aimed at streamlining and reducing the size of the administrative state generally. This plan will set the tone for Trump’s budget proposal next year.
  3. memorandum from the new Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) administrator Neomi Rao directing agencies, for the first time as far as I can tell, to propose an overall incremental regulatory cost allowance for the agency in the new edition of their “Unified Agenda” on regulations. This report will appear in the fall. Prior editions, since the 1980s, would label rules as “economically significant,” but never has there been such a “regulatory budget.” Rao says, “OMB expects that each agency will propose a net reduction in total incremental regulatory costs for FY 2018.”

So, let me guess – you haven’t heard about this, right? That’s because the media have largely ignored it. Yeah, they never miss an opportunity to criticize President Trump, but somehow this massive rollback of regulation has escaped their notice.

 

Without economic liberty there can be no general freedom, which is why a decrease in the regulatory state is so important. There are many areas where I deeply disagree with President Trump, but increasing economic freedom is no small feat and it deserves a standing ovation. 

#Free #Apocalyptic #Book   Leave a comment

A Threatening Fragility Front CoverIn honor of its launch, A Threatening Fragility (Book 3 of the Transformation Project), is #free this week, while the rest of my catalog is #99cents #sale. so you can pick up the entire #series and my other books for less than A Threatening Fragility will cost next week.

Posted November 9, 2017 by aurorawatcherak in book promotion, Uncategorized

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